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Women's preferences for selective estrogen reuptake modulators: an investigation using the time trade off technique

Ralph, Angelique F, Ager, Brittany, Bell, Melanie L., Collins, Ian M., Andrews, Lesley, Tucker, Kathy, O’Reilly, Nicole, Phillips, Kelly-Anne and Butow, Phyllis 2014, Women's preferences for selective estrogen reuptake modulators: an investigation using the time trade off technique, SpringerPlus, vol. 3, pp. 1-9.

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Title Women's preferences for selective estrogen reuptake modulators: an investigation using the time trade off technique
Author(s) Ralph, Angelique F
Ager, Brittany
Bell, Melanie L.
Collins, Ian M.ORCID iD for Collins, Ian M. orcid.org/0000-0001-6936-0942
Andrews, Lesley
Tucker, Kathy
O’Reilly, Nicole
Phillips, Kelly-Anne
Butow, Phyllis
Journal name SpringerPlus
Volume number 3
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2014-05-24
ISSN 2193-1801
Keyword(s) Breast cancer
Chemoprevention
SERMs
Patient preferences
BRCA1
Summary PurposeSelective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs) reduce the risk of breast cancer for women at increased risk by 38%. However, uptake is extremely low and the reasons for this are not completely understood. The aims of this study were to utilize time trade-off methods to determine the degree of risk reduction required to make taking SERMs worthwhile to women, and the factors associated with requiring greater risk reduction to take SERMs. MethodsWomen at increased risk of breast cancer (N = 107) were recruited from two familial cancer clinics in Australia. Participants completed a questionnaire either online or in pen and paper format. Hierarchical multiple linear regression analysis was used to analyze the data. ResultsOverall, there was considerable heterogeneity in the degree of risk reduction required to make taking SERMs worthwhile. Women with higher perceived breast cancer risk and those with stronger intentions to undergo (or who had undergone) an oophorectomy required a smaller degree of risk reduction to consider taking SERMs worthwhile. ConclusionWomen at increased familial risk appear motivated to consider SERMs for prevention. A tailored approach to communicating about medical prevention is essential. Health professionals could usefully highlight the absolute (rather than relative) probability of side effects and take into account an individual’s perceived (rather than objective) risk of breast cancer.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072841

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.