You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Patterns of intergroup contact in public spaces: micro-ecology of segregation in Australian communities

Priest, Naomi, Paradies, Yin, Ferdinand, Angeline, Rouhani, Lobna and Kelaher, Margaret 2014, Patterns of intergroup contact in public spaces: micro-ecology of segregation in Australian communities, Societies, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 30-44, doi: 10.3390/soc4010030.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
paradies-patternsof-2014.pdf Published version application/pdf 88.44KB 32

Title Patterns of intergroup contact in public spaces: micro-ecology of segregation in Australian communities
Author(s) Priest, Naomi
Paradies, YinORCID iD for Paradies, Yin orcid.org/0000-0001-9927-7074
Ferdinand, Angeline
Rouhani, Lobna
Kelaher, Margaret
Journal name Societies
Volume number 4
Issue number 1
Start page 30
End page 44
Total pages 15
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2014-01-07
ISSN 2075-4698
Keyword(s) A13
A14
P
P0
P1
P2
P3
P4
P5
Z1
intergroup contact
public space
segregation
Australia
observation
diversity
Summary The use of public spaces can promote social cohesion and facilitate interpersonal interactions within the community. However, the ways racial and ethnic groups interact in public spaces can also reflect and influence informal segregation in the wider community. The present study aimed to examine patterns of intergroup contact within public spaces in Victoria, Australia through short-term observation in four localities. Data were collected on within-group, intergroup and absence of contact for people from minority and majority groups. A total of 974 contacts were observed. Findings indicate that in the observed public spaces, people from visible minority groups tended to have no contact with others or to interact with people from other ethnic/racial groups. In contrast, those from the majority group tended to interact predominately with other majority group members. This suggests that majority group members are more likely to ‘self-segregate’ in public spaces than those from minority groups.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/soc4010030
Field of Research 160803 Race and Ethnic Relations
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, MDPI
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072938

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 179 Abstract Views, 33 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 04 May 2015, 13:48:52 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.