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Prevalence and stability of active play, restricted movement and television viewing in infants

Hesketh, Kylie D., Crawford, David A., Abbott, Gavin, Campbell, Karen J. and Salmon, Jo 2015, Prevalence and stability of active play, restricted movement and television viewing in infants, Early child development and care, vol. 185, no. 6, pp. 883-894, doi: 10.1080/03004430.2014.963066.

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Title Prevalence and stability of active play, restricted movement and television viewing in infants
Author(s) Hesketh, Kylie D.ORCID iD for Hesketh, Kylie D. orcid.org/0000-0002-2702-7110
Crawford, David A.ORCID iD for Crawford, David A. orcid.org/0000-0002-2467-7556
Abbott, GavinORCID iD for Abbott, Gavin orcid.org/0000-0003-4014-0705
Campbell, Karen J.ORCID iD for Campbell, Karen J. orcid.org/0000-0002-4499-3396
Salmon, JoORCID iD for Salmon, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Journal name Early child development and care
Volume number 185
Issue number 6
Start page 883
End page 894
Total pages 12
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 0300-4430
1476-8275
Keyword(s) active play
early childhood
physical activity
restraint
television
Summary This study describes engagement in and stability of physical activity and sedentary behaviours in early life, and assesses associations with sex, maternal education and developmental stage. Maternal-report data at child age 4, 9 and 20 months were collected from 542 families in the Melbourne Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial Program. Parents estimated average time per day their child spent in active pursuits or pursuits that restricted movement. With increasing age, children generally spent more time in active pursuits and watching television, and less time in situations that restrict movement. Associations were found with age of developmental milestone attainment but not sex or maternal education. Stability over time was strongest for television viewing (β = 0.34–0.38) and time spent outdoors (β = 0.27–0.33). Contrary to guidelines, television viewing increased and showed stability, suggesting a need to target this behaviour very early in life to achieve optimal longer term outcomes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/03004430.2014.963066
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID NHMRC 425801
Copyright notice ©2014, Taylor & Francis
Free to Read? Yes
Free to Read Start Date 2017-07-01
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072960

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.