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A brief review of exercise, bipolar disorder, and mechanistic pathways.

Thomson,D, Turner,A, Lauder,S, Gigler,ME, Berk,L, Singh,AB, Pasco,JA, Berk,M and Sylvia,L 2015, A brief review of exercise, bipolar disorder, and mechanistic pathways., Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 6, pp. 147, doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00147.

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Title A brief review of exercise, bipolar disorder, and mechanistic pathways.
Author(s) Thomson,D
Turner,A
Lauder,S
Gigler,ME
Berk,L
Singh,AB
Pasco,JAORCID iD for Pasco,JA orcid.org/0000-0002-8968-4714
Berk,MORCID iD for Berk,M orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Sylvia,L
Journal name Frontiers in Psychology
Volume number 6
Start page 147
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Switzerland
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1664-1078
Keyword(s) bipolar disorder
depression
exercise
hypomania
mechanistic pathways
neurogenesis
Social Sciences
Psychology, Multidisciplinary
Psychology
APPROACH SYSTEM BAS
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
PSYCHIATRIC-DISORDERS
SPECTRUM DISORDERS
RANDOMIZED-TRIALS
MENTAL-ILLNESS
BLOOD-PRESSURE
SYMPTOMS
STRESS
Summary Despite evidence that exercise has been found to be effective in the treatment of depression, it is unclear whether these data can be extrapolated to bipolar disorder. Available evidence for bipolar disorder is scant, with no existing randomized controlled trials having tested the impact of exercise on depressive, manic or hypomanic symptomatology. Although exercise is often recommended in bipolar disorder, this is based on extrapolation from the unipolar literature, theory and clinical expertise and not empirical evidence. In addition, there are currently no available empirical data on program variables, with practical implications on frequency, intensity and type of exercise derived from unipolar depression studies. The aim of the current paper is to explore the relationship between exercise and bipolar disorder and potential mechanistic pathways. Given the high rate of medical co-morbidities experienced by people with bipolar disorder, it is possible that exercise is a potentially useful and important intervention with regard to general health benefits; however, further research is required to elucidate the impact of exercise on mood symptomology.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00147
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Frontiers Media
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073072

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.