You are not logged in.

Glucose administration and cognitive function: differential effects of age and effort during a dual task paradigm in younger and older adults

Macpherson,H, Roberstson,B, Sünram-Lea,S, Stough,C, Kennedy,D and Scholey,A 2015, Glucose administration and cognitive function: differential effects of age and effort during a dual task paradigm in younger and older adults, Psychopharmacology, vol. 232, no. 6, pp. 1135-1142, doi: 10.1007/s00213-014-3750-8.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Glucose administration and cognitive function: differential effects of age and effort during a dual task paradigm in younger and older adults
Author(s) Macpherson,HORCID iD for Macpherson,H orcid.org/0000-0002-3603-9359
Roberstson,B
Sünram-Lea,S
Stough,C
Kennedy,D
Scholey,A
Journal name Psychopharmacology
Volume number 232
Issue number 6
Start page 1135
End page 1142
Total pages 8
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2015-03
ISSN 1432-2072
Keyword(s) Aging
Cognitive enhancement
Glucose
Hippocampus
Memory
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Neurosciences
Pharmacology & Pharmacy
Psychiatry
Neurosciences & Neurology
EPISODIC MEMORY
DIVIDED ATTENTION
BLOOD-GLUCOSE
MENTAL EFFORT
RECOGNITION MEMORY
ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE
DECLARATIVE MEMORY
PERFORMANCE
ENHANCEMENT
FACILITATION
Summary RATIONALE: Current research suggests that glucose facilitates performance on cognitive tasks which possess an episodic memory component and a relatively high level of cognitive demand. However, the extent to which this glucose facilitation effect is uniform across the lifespan is uncertain. METHODS: This study was a repeated measures, randomised, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial designed to assess the cognitive effects of glucose in younger and older adults under single and dual task conditions. Participants were 24 healthy younger (average age 20.6 years) and 24 healthy older adults (average age 72.5 years). They completed a recognition memory task after consuming drinks containing 25 g glucose and a placebo drink, both in the presence and absence of a secondary tracking task. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Glucose enhanced recognition memory response time and tracking precision during the secondary task, in older adults only. These findings do not support preferential targeting of hippocampal function by glucose, rather they suggest that glucose administration differentially increases the availability of attentional resources in older individuals.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s00213-014-3750-8
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 920502 Health Related to Ageing
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Springer Verlag
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073122

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 144 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 08 May 2015, 11:34:58 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.