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Inclusion in political and public life: the experiences of people with intellectual disability on government disability advisory bodies in Australia

Frawley,P and Bigby,C 2011, Inclusion in political and public life: the experiences of people with intellectual disability on government disability advisory bodies in Australia, Journal of intellectual and developmental disability, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 27-38, doi: 10.3109/13668250.2010.549465.

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Title Inclusion in political and public life: the experiences of people with intellectual disability on government disability advisory bodies in Australia
Author(s) Frawley,PORCID iD for Frawley,P orcid.org/0000-0002-7643-4935
Bigby,C
Journal name Journal of intellectual and developmental disability
Volume number 36
Issue number 1
Start page 27
End page 38
Total pages 12
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2011
ISSN 1469-9532
Keyword(s) Adult
Advisory Committees
Australia
Disabled Persons
Female
Government
Humans
Intellectual Disability
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Politics
Qualitative Research
Social Participation
Young Adult
advisory boards
participation
political activity
social inclusion
Summary BACKGROUND: Civil and political participation lies at the core of citizenship. Increasingly, people with intellectual disability are members of disability advisory bodies. This study investigated the political orientations of advisory body members with intellectual disability, their participatory experiences, and the types of support they received. METHOD: The 9 people with intellectual disability who in 2005 were members of disability advisory bodies at a state, national, and Victorian local government level were interviewed, together with 12 other members or secretariat staff of these bodies. Observations were also conducted of advisory body meetings. RESULTS: The political perspective of members with intellectual disability varied, but all had a background in self-advocacy. They found the work hard but rewarding and encountered both practical and intangible obstacles to participation. Members received varying types of practical support, but a supportive collegial milieu was characteristic among members who felt most confident about their participation. CONCLUSIONS: The milieu, structures, and processes of advisory bodies must all be adjusted to accommodate people with intellectual disability if they are to participate meaningfully.
Language eng
DOI 10.3109/13668250.2010.549465
Field of Research 111711 Health Information Systems (incl Surveillance)
Socio Economic Objective 920403 Disability and Functional Capacity
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2011, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073157

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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