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Application of dynamic metabolomics to examine in vivo skeletal muscle glucose metabolism in the chronically high-fat fed mouse.

Kowalski, Greg M., De Souza, David P., Burch, Micah L., Hamley, Steven, Kloehn, Joachim, Selathurai, Ahrathy, Tull, Dedreia, O'Callaghan, Sean, McConville, Malcolm J. and Bruce, Clinton R. 2015, Application of dynamic metabolomics to examine in vivo skeletal muscle glucose metabolism in the chronically high-fat fed mouse., Biochemical biophysical research communications, vol. 462, no. 1, pp. 27-32, doi: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2015.04.096.

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Title Application of dynamic metabolomics to examine in vivo skeletal muscle glucose metabolism in the chronically high-fat fed mouse.
Author(s) Kowalski, Greg M.ORCID iD for Kowalski, Greg M. orcid.org/0000-0002-1599-017X
De Souza, David P.
Burch, Micah L.
Hamley, Steven
Kloehn, Joachim
Selathurai, AhrathyORCID iD for Selathurai, Ahrathy orcid.org/0000-0003-2349-3496
Tull, Dedreia
O'Callaghan, Sean
McConville, Malcolm J.
Bruce, Clinton R.ORCID iD for Bruce, Clinton R. orcid.org/0000-0002-0515-3343
Journal name Biochemical biophysical research communications
Volume number 462
Issue number 1
Start page 27
End page 32
Total pages 6
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-05-29
ISSN 1090-2104
Keyword(s) Metabolomics
Muscle insulin resistance
Stable isotopes
Summary RATIONALE: Defects in muscle glucose metabolism are linked to type 2 diabetes. Mechanistic studies examining these defects rely on the use of high fat-fed rodent models and typically involve the determination of muscle glucose uptake under insulin-stimulated conditions. While insightful, they do not necessarily reflect the physiology of the postprandial state. In addition, most studies do not examine aspects of glucose metabolism beyond the uptake process. Here we present an approach to study rodent muscle glucose and intermediary metabolism under the dynamic and physiologically relevant setting of the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). METHODS AND RESULTS: In vivo muscle glucose and intermediary metabolism was investigated following oral administration of [U-(13)C] glucose. Quadriceps muscles were collected 15 and 60 min after glucose administration and metabolite flux profiling was determined by measuring (13)C mass isotopomers in glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. While no dietary effects were noted in the glycolytic pathway, muscle from mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) exhibited a reduction in labelling in TCA intermediates. Interestingly, this appeared to be independent of alterations in flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase. In addition, our findings suggest that TCA cycle anaplerosis is negligible in muscle during an OGTT. CONCLUSIONS: Under the dynamic physiologically relevant conditions of the OGTT, skeletal muscle from HFD fed mice exhibits alterations in glucose metabolism at the level of the TCA cycle.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.bbrc.2015.04.096
Field of Research 111603 Systems Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 920104 Diabetes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073185

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research
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