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'Just dance' with digital literacy

Oughtred, Christine and Robertson, Sabina 2016, 'Just dance' with digital literacy, Deakin University Library, Geelong, Vic., doi: 10.21153/dsc2016no4art1.

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Title 'Just dance' with digital literacy
Author(s) Oughtred, Christine
Robertson, Sabina
Publication date 2016-04
Series discourse: Deakin University Library research and practice
Issue number 4
Total pages 8
Publisher Deakin University Library
Place of publication Geelong, Vic.
Keyword(s) digital literacy
collaboration
librarian academic collaboration
higher education
authentic learning activities
aligning learning activities with assessment tasks
Summary In a rapidly changing higher education environment, Deakin University’s promise is to offer “brilliant education where the students are ‐ and where they want to go”. Targets set for learning, teaching and research, have significant implications across the University. Collaboration at all levels of the organization is core to achieving goals that deliver value to the student community.

The Library is charged with delivering one of the University's eight graduate learning outcomes, Digital Literacy, with initiatives required to build staff capability and contribute to student learning. Deakin University defines Digital Literacy as using technologies to find, use and disseminate information.

This paper provides an analysis of a case study in which liaison librarians collaborated with science academics to develop innovative digital literacy activities and assessment tasks for undergraduate units related to ‘Judging Reliability and Accuracy of Information’.

The case study reveals that engaging students in meaningful learning activities and assessment tasks creates dynamic and powerful learning experiences for first and second year students. In addition, the leadership that the liaison librarians demonstrate in activities that capitalise on problem based learning, elements of gaming, peer assessment, and new ways of communicating has prompted open conversations and collaborations with academics about further opportunities.
Notes This paper was previously presented at ALIA 2015 : Information online : Proceedings of the 2015 Australian Library and Information Association Information Online Conference
ISSN 2205-0531
Language eng
DOI 10.21153/dsc2016no4art1
Field of Research 080707 Organisation of Information and Knowledge Resources
Socio Economic Objective 970108 Expanding Knowledge in the Information and Computing Sciences
HERDC Research category A6 Research report/technical paper
Copyright notice ©2016, Deakin University Library
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073227

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.