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Is there evidence of selection in the dopamine receptor D4 gene in Australian invasive starling populations?

Rollins, Lee Ann, Whitehead, Michael R., Woolnough, Andrew P., Sinclair, Ron and Sherwin, William B. 2015, Is there evidence of selection in the dopamine receptor D4 gene in Australian invasive starling populations?, Current zoology, vol. 61, no. 3, pp. 505-519, doi: 10.1093/czoolo/61.3.505.

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Title Is there evidence of selection in the dopamine receptor D4 gene in Australian invasive starling populations?
Author(s) Rollins, Lee AnnORCID iD for Rollins, Lee Ann orcid.org/0000-0002-3279-7005
Whitehead, Michael R.
Woolnough, Andrew P.
Sinclair, Ron
Sherwin, William B.
Journal name Current zoology
Volume number 61
Issue number 3
Start page 505
End page 519
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2015
Keyword(s) DRD4
starling
selection
novelty-seeking behaviour
Summary  Although population genetic theory is largely based on the premise that loci under study are selectively neutral, it has been acknowledged that the study of DNA sequence data under the influence of selection can be useful. In some circumstances, these loci show increased population differentiation and gene diversity. Highly polymorphic loci may be especially useful when studying populations having low levels of diversity overall, such as is often the case with threatened or newly established invasive populations. Using common starlings Sturnus vulgaris sampled from invasive Australian populations, we investigated sequence data of the dopamine receptor D4 gene (DRD4), a locus suspected to be under selection for novelty-seeking behaviour in a range of taxa including humans and passerine birds. We hypothesised that such behaviour may be advantageous when species encounter novel environments, such as during invasion. In addition to analyses to detect the presence of selection, we also estimated population differentiation and gene diversity using DRD4 data and compared these estimates to those from microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA sequence data, using the same individuals. We found little evidence for selection on DRD4 in starlings. However, we did find elevated levels of within-population gene diversity when compared to microsatellites and mitochondrial DNA sequence, as well as a greater degree of population differentiation. We suggest that sequence data from putatively nonneutral loci are a useful addition to studies of invasive populations, where low genetic variability is expected.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/czoolo/61.3.505
Field of Research 060411 Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID LP0455776
Copyright notice ©2015, Current Zoology
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073268

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.