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Clinical trials of N-acetylcysteine in psychiatry and neurology: A systematic review

Deepmala,, Slattery, John, Kumar, Nihit, Delhey, Leanna, Berk, Michael, Dean, Olivia, Spielholz, Charles and Frye, Richard 2015, Clinical trials of N-acetylcysteine in psychiatry and neurology: A systematic review, Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, vol. 55, pp. 294-321, doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2015.04.015.

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Title Clinical trials of N-acetylcysteine in psychiatry and neurology: A systematic review
Author(s) Deepmala,
Slattery, John
Kumar, Nihit
Delhey, Leanna
Berk, MichaelORCID iD for Berk, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Dean, OliviaORCID iD for Dean, Olivia orcid.org/0000-0002-2776-3935
Spielholz, Charles
Frye, Richard
Journal name Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Volume number 55
Start page 294
End page 321
Total pages 28
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-08
ISSN 1873-7528
Keyword(s) N-acetylcysteine
NAC
mechanism of action
neurology
psychiatry
Summary N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is recognized for its role in acetaminophen overdose and as a mucolytic. Over the past decade, there has been growing evidence for the use of NAC in treating psychiatric and neurological disorders, considering its role in attenuating pathophysiological processes associated with these disorders, including oxidative stress, apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, neuroinflammation and glutamate and dopamine dysregulation. In this systematic review we find favorable evidence for the use of NAC in several psychiatric and neurological disorders, particularly autism, Alzheimer's disease, cocaine and cannabis addiction, bipolar disorder, depression, trichotillomania, nail biting, skin picking, obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, drug-induced neuropathy and progressive myoclonic epilepsy. Disorders such as anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and mild traumatic brain injury have preliminary evidence and require larger confirmatory studies while current evidence does not support the use of NAC in gambling, methamphetamine and nicotine addictions and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Overall, NAC treatment appears to be safe and tolerable. Further well designed, larger controlled trials are needed for specific psychiatric and neurological disorders where the evidence is favorable.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2015.04.015
Field of Research 110319 Psychiatry (incl Psychotherapy)
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073274

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
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Created: Thu, 14 May 2015, 09:55:51 EST

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