Patient participation in pulmonary interventions to reduce postoperative pulmonary complications following cardiac surgery.

McTier, Lauren, Botti, Mari and Duke, Maxine 2016, Patient participation in pulmonary interventions to reduce postoperative pulmonary complications following cardiac surgery., Australian Critical Care, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 35-40, doi: 10.1016/j.aucc.2015.04.001.

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Title Patient participation in pulmonary interventions to reduce postoperative pulmonary complications following cardiac surgery.
Author(s) McTier, LaurenORCID iD for McTier, Lauren orcid.org/0000-0003-4847-8380
Botti, MariORCID iD for Botti, Mari orcid.org/0000-0002-2782-0987
Duke, MaxineORCID iD for Duke, Maxine orcid.org/0000-0003-1567-3956
Journal name Australian Critical Care
Volume number 29
Issue number 1
Start page 35
End page 40
Total pages 6
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-02
ISSN 1036-7314
Keyword(s) Acute care
Patient participation
Postoperative care
Quality and safety
Summary BACKGROUND: Clinical interventions aimed at reducing the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications necessitate patient engagement and participation in care. Patients' ability and willingness to participate in care to reduce postoperative complications is unclear. Further, nurses' facilitation of patient participation in pulmonary interventions has not been explored. OBJECTIVE: To explore patients' ability and willingness to participate in pulmonary interventions and nurses' facilitation of pulmonary interventions. DESIGN: Single institution, case study design. Multiple methods of data collection were used including preadmission (n=130) and pre-discharge (n=98) patient interviews, naturalistic observations (n=48) and nursing focus group interviews (n=2). SETTING: A cardiac surgical ward of a major metropolitan, tertiary referral hospital in Melbourne, Australia. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred and thirty patients admitted for cardiac surgery via the preadmission clinic during a 1-year period and 40 registered nurses who were part of the permanent workforce on the cardiac surgical ward. OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients' understanding of their role in pulmonary interventions and patients' preference for and reported involvement in pulmonary management. Nurses' facilitation of patients to participate in pulmonary interventions. RESULTS: Patients displayed a greater understanding of their role in pulmonary interventions after their surgical admission than they did at preadmission. While 55% of patients preferred to make decisions about deep breathing and coughing exercises, three-quarters of patients (75%) reported they made decisions about deep breathing and coughing during their surgical admission. Nurses missed opportunities to engage patients in this aspect of pulmonary management. CONCLUSIONS: Patients appear willing to take responsibility for pulmonary management in the postoperative period. Nurses could enhance patient participation in pulmonary interventions by ensuring adequate information and education is provided. Facilitation of patients' participation in their recovery is a fundamental aspect of care delivery in this context.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.aucc.2015.04.001
Field of Research 111003 Clinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073306

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