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Cognitive impairment in first-episode mania: a systematic review of the evidence in the acute and remission phases of the illness

Daglas, Rothanthi, Yücel, Murat, Cotton, Sue, Allott, Kelly, Hetrick, Sarah and Berk, Michael 2015, Cognitive impairment in first-episode mania: a systematic review of the evidence in the acute and remission phases of the illness, International Journal of Bipolar Disorders, vol. 3, no. 9, pp. 1-18.

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Title Cognitive impairment in first-episode mania: a systematic review of the evidence in the acute and remission phases of the illness
Author(s) Daglas, Rothanthi
Yücel, Murat
Cotton, Sue
Allott, Kelly
Hetrick, Sarah
Berk, MichaelORCID iD for Berk, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Journal name International Journal of Bipolar Disorders
Volume number 3
Issue number 9
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publication date 2015
ISSN 2194-7511
Keyword(s) Bipolar disorder
Cognition
Depression
Early intervention
First episode
Mania
Summary There is evidence of cognitive impairment that persists in the remission phase of bipolar disorder; however, the extent of the deficits that occur from the first onset of the disorder remains unclear. This is the first systematic review on cognitive functioning in the early stages of bipolar I disorder. The aim of the study was to identify the patterns and degree of cognitive impairment that exists from first-episode mania. Three electronic databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO and PubMed) were systematically searched for studies published from January 1980 to June 2014. Eligible studies were separated into two groups: acute and remission. The Newcastle-Ottawa quality assessment scale was utilised to measure the quality of the included studies. A total of seven studies (three acute and four remission), including 230 first-episode mania and 345 healthy control participants, were eligible for the review. The studies in the acute phase only examined aspects of executive functioning, with impairments identified in cognitive flexibility, though not in response inhibition and verbal fluency relative to healthy controls. The most consistent finding during the remission phase was a deficit in working memory, whereas in the other domains, the findings were equivocal. Non-verbal memory and verbal fluency were not impacted in remission from first-episode mania. In conclusion, deficits are present in some but not all areas of cognitive functioning during the early stages of bipolar I disorder. Further research is warranted to understand the longitudinal trajectory of change from first-episode mania.
Language eng
Field of Research 110319 Psychiatry (incl Psychotherapy)
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Springer
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073334

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.