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International study of perceived neighbourhood environmental attributes and Body Mass Index: IPEN Adult study in 12 countries

De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse, Van Dyck, Delfien, Salvo, Deborah, Davey, Rachel, Reis, Rodrigo S., Schofield, Grant, Sarmiento, Olga L., Mitas, Josef, Christiansen, Lars Breum, MacFarlane, Duncan, Sugiyama, Takemi, Aguinaga-Ontoso, Ines, Owen, Neville, Conway, Terry L., Sallis, James F. and Cerin, Ester 2015, International study of perceived neighbourhood environmental attributes and Body Mass Index: IPEN Adult study in 12 countries, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 12, no. 62, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/s12966-015-0228-y.

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Title International study of perceived neighbourhood environmental attributes and Body Mass Index: IPEN Adult study in 12 countries
Author(s) De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse
Van Dyck, Delfien
Salvo, Deborah
Davey, Rachel
Reis, Rodrigo S.
Schofield, Grant
Sarmiento, Olga L.
Mitas, Josef
Christiansen, Lars Breum
MacFarlane, Duncan
Sugiyama, Takemi
Aguinaga-Ontoso, Ines
Owen, Neville
Conway, Terry L.
Sallis, James F.
Cerin, Ester
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 12
Issue number 62
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) Built environment
International
Pooled data
Weight status
Summary BACKGROUND: Ecological models of health behaviour are an important conceptual framework to address the multiple correlates of obesity. Several single-country studies previously examined the relationship between the built environment and obesity in adults, but results are very diverse. An important reason for these mixed results is the limited variability in built environments in these single-country studies. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine associations between perceived neighbourhood built environmental attributes and BMI/weight status in a multi-country study including 12 environmentally and culturally diverse countries. METHODS: A multi-site cross-sectional study was conducted in 17 cities (study sites) across 12 countries (Australia, Belgium, Brazil, China, Colombia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Mexico, New Zealand, Spain, the UK and USA). Participants (n = 14222, 18-66 years) self-reported perceived neighbourhood environmental attributes. Height and weight were self-reported in eight countries, and measured in person in four countries. RESULTS: Three environmental attributes were associated with BMI or weight status in pooled data from 12 countries. Safety from traffic was the most robust correlate, suggesting that creating safe routes for walking/cycling by reducing the speed and volume of traffic might have a positive impact upon weight status/BMI across various geographical locations. Close proximity to several local destinations was associated with BMI across all countries, suggesting compact neighbourhoods with more places to walk related to lower BMI. Safety from crime showed a curvilinear relationship with BMI, with especially poor crime safety being related to higher BMI. CONCLUSIONS: Environmental interventions involving these three attributes appear to have international relevance and focusing on these might have implications for tackling overweight/obesity.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0228-y
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, BioMed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073485

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.