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Does maternal psychopathology increase the risk of pre-schooler obesity? A systematic review

Benton, Pree M., Skouteris, Helen and Hayden, Melissa 2015, Does maternal psychopathology increase the risk of pre-schooler obesity? A systematic review, Appetite, vol. 87, pp. 259-282, doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2014.12.227.

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Title Does maternal psychopathology increase the risk of pre-schooler obesity? A systematic review
Author(s) Benton, Pree M.
Skouteris, Helen
Hayden, MelissaORCID iD for Hayden, Melissa orcid.org/0000-0002-4837-5894
Journal name Appetite
Volume number 87
Start page 259
End page 282
Total pages 24
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-04
ISSN 1095-8304
Keyword(s) Maternal depression
Maternal psychopathology
Obesity
Pre-schooler
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Behavioral Sciences
Nutrition & Dietetics
BODY-MASS INDEX
LOW-INCOME CHILDREN
OF-THE-LITERATURE
DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS
CHILDHOOD OBESITY
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
POSTNATAL DEPRESSION
SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS
FEEDING PRACTICES
YOUNG-CHILDREN
Summary The preschool years may be a critical period for child obesity onset; however, literature examining obesity risk factors to date has largely focused on school-aged children. Several links have been made between maternal depression and childhood obesity risks; however, other types of maternal psychopathology have been widely neglected. The aim of the present review was to systematically identify articles that examined relationships between maternal psychopathology variables, including depressive and anxiety symptoms, self-esteem and body dissatisfaction, and risks for pre-schooler obesity, including weight outcomes, physical activity and sedentary behaviour levels, and nutrition/diet variables. Twenty articles meeting review criteria were identified. Results showed positive associations between maternal depressive symptoms and increased risks for pre-schooler obesity in the majority of studies. Results were inconsistent depending on the time at which depression was measured (i.e., antenatal, postnatal, in isolation or longitudinally). Anxiety and body dissatisfaction were only measured in single studies; however, both were linked to pre-schooler obesity risks; self-esteem was not measured by any studies. We concluded that maternal depressive symptoms are important to consider when assessing risks for obesity in preschool-aged children; however, more research is needed examining the impact of other facets of maternal psychopathology on obesity risk in pre-schoolers.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2014.12.227
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920507 Women's Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073498

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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