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Are quitting-related cognitions and behaviours predicted by proximal responses to plain packaging with larger health warnings? Findings from a national cohort study with Australian adult smokers

Brennan, Emily, Durkin, Sarah, Coomber, Kerri, Zacher, Meghan, Scollo, Michelle and Wakefield, Melanie 2015, Are quitting-related cognitions and behaviours predicted by proximal responses to plain packaging with larger health warnings? Findings from a national cohort study with Australian adult smokers, Tobacco control, vol. 24, no. Supplement 2, pp. ii33-ii41, doi: 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2014-052057.

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Title Are quitting-related cognitions and behaviours predicted by proximal responses to plain packaging with larger health warnings? Findings from a national cohort study with Australian adult smokers
Author(s) Brennan, Emily
Durkin, Sarah
Coomber, Kerri
Zacher, Meghan
Scollo, Michelle
Wakefield, Melanie
Journal name Tobacco control
Volume number 24
Issue number Supplement 2
Start page ii33
End page ii41
Total pages 9
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-04-01
ISSN 0964-4563
Summary Background: Implementation of tobacco plain packaging (PP) with larger graphic health warnings (GHWs) in Australia had positive effects on responses reflecting the specific objectives of the PP policy and on follow-up quitting-related cognitions and behaviours. The aim of this study was to examine predictive relationships bewteen these proximal and distal outcomes.
Methods: A nationally representative sample of Australian adult cigarette smokers completed a baseline survey and a 1-month follow-up survey within the first year of policy implementation (n(weighted)=3215). Logistic regression analyses tested whether baseline measures of cigarette appeal, GHW effectiveness, perceived harm and concern/enjoyment predicted each of seven follow-up measures of quitted-related cognitions and behaviours, adjusting for baseline levels of the outcome and covariates.
Results: In multivariable models, we found consistent evidence that several baseline measures of GHW effectiveness positively and significantly predicted the likelihood that smokers at follow-up reported thinking about quitting at least daily, intending to quit, having a firm date to quit, stubbing out cigarettes prematurely, stopping oneself from smoking and having attempted to quit. Two of the quitting-related outcomes were also predicted by feeling more smoking-related concern than enjoyment. A smaller number of the appeal variables were prospectively associated with quitting-related outcomes, while believing that brands do not differ in harmlessness did not positively predict any outcomes.
Conclusions: These findings provide an initial insight into the pathways through which PP with larger GHWs may lead to changes in smoking behaviour. Future research should examine whether the effects are conditional on individual demographic and smoking characteristics.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2014-052057
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, BMJ Publishing Group
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073531

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Created: Fri, 29 May 2015, 09:41:07 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.