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Making robust policy decisions using global biodiversity indicators

Nicholson, Emily, Collen, Ben, Barausse, Alberto, Blanchard, Julia L., Costelloe, Brendan T., Sullivan, Kathryn M. E., Underwood, Fiona M., Burn, Robert W., Fritz, Steffen, Jones, Julia P. G., McRae, Louise, Possingham, Hugh P. and Milner-Gulland, E. J. 2012, Making robust policy decisions using global biodiversity indicators, PLoS One, vol. 7, no. 7, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0041128.

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Title Making robust policy decisions using global biodiversity indicators
Author(s) Nicholson, EmilyORCID iD for Nicholson, Emily orcid.org/0000-0003-2199-3446
Collen, Ben
Barausse, Alberto
Blanchard, Julia L.
Costelloe, Brendan T.
Sullivan, Kathryn M. E.
Underwood, Fiona M.
Burn, Robert W.
Fritz, Steffen
Jones, Julia P. G.
McRae, Louise
Possingham, Hugh P.
Milner-Gulland, E. J.
Journal name PLoS One
Volume number 7
Issue number 7
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2012-07-18
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
PARTIALLY PROTECTED AREAS
ECOSYSTEM SERVICES
FISHERIES MANAGEMENT
REFERENCE POINTS
CONSERVATION
POPULATIONS
FRAMEWORK
DECLINES
TRACKING
COLLAPSE
Summary In order to influence global policy effectively, conservation scientists need to be able to provide robust predictions of the impact of alternative policies on biodiversity and measure progress towards goals using reliable indicators. We present a framework for using biodiversity indicators predictively to inform policy choices at a global level. The approach is illustrated with two case studies in which we project forwards the impacts of feasible policies on trends in biodiversity and in relevant indicators. The policies are based on targets agreed at the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) meeting in Nagoya in October 2010. The first case study compares protected area policies for African mammals, assessed using the Red List Index; the second example uses the Living Planet Index to assess the impact of a complete halt, versus a reduction, in bottom trawling. In the protected areas example, we find that the indicator can aid in decision-making because it is able to differentiate between the impacts of the different policies. In the bottom trawling example, the indicator exhibits some counter-intuitive behaviour, due to over-representation of some taxonomic and functional groups in the indicator, and contrasting impacts of the policies on different groups caused by trophic interactions. Our results support the need for further research on how to use predictive models and indicators to credibly track trends and inform policy. To be useful and relevant, scientists must make testable predictions about the impact of global policy on biodiversity to ensure that targets such as those set at Nagoya catalyse effective and measurable change.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0041128
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
060208 Terrestrial Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 960805 Flora
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073633

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.