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The association between socio-economic position and diet quality in Australian adults

Backholer, Kathryn, Spencer, Elizabeth, Gearon, Emma, Magliano, Dianna J., McNaughton, Sarah A., Shaw, Jonathan E. and Peeters, Anna 2016, The association between socio-economic position and diet quality in Australian adults, Public health nutrition, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 477-485, doi: 10.1017/S1368980015001470.

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Title The association between socio-economic position and diet quality in Australian adults
Author(s) Backholer, Kathryn
Spencer, Elizabeth
Gearon, Emma
Magliano, Dianna J.
McNaughton, Sarah A.ORCID iD for McNaughton, Sarah A. orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Shaw, Jonathan E.
Peeters, AnnaORCID iD for Peeters, Anna orcid.org/0000-0003-4340-9132
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 19
Issue number 3
Start page 477
End page 485
Total pages 9
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2016-02
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) diet quality
education
obesity
socio-economic position
Summary Objective: We aimed to investigate the association between multiple measures of socio-economic position (SEP) and diet quality, using a diet quality index representing current national dietary guidelines, in the Australian adult population. Design: Cross-sectional study. Linear regression analyses were used to estimate the association between indicators of SEP (educational attainment, level of income and area-level disadvantage) and diet quality (measured using the Dietary Guideline Index (DGI)) in the total sample and stratified by sex and age (≤55 years and >55 years). Setting: A large randomly selected sample of the Australian adult population. Subjects: Australian adults (n 9296; aged ≥25 years) from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study. Results: A higher level of educational attainment and income and a lower level of area-level disadvantage were significantly associated with a higher DGI score, across the gradient of SEP. The association between indicators of SEP and DGI score was consistently stronger among those aged ≤55 years compared with their older counterparts. The most disadvantaged group had a DGI score between 2 and 5 units lower (depending on the marker of SEP) compared with the group with the least disadvantage. Conclusions: A higher level of SEP was consistently associated with a higher level of diet quality for all indicators of SEP examined. In order to reduce socio-economic inequalities in diet quality, healthy eating initiatives need to act across the gradient of socio-economic disadvantage with a proportionate focus on those with greater socio-economic disadvantage.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S1368980015001470
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Free to Read Start Date 2016-09-01
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073670

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.