You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

"I tell ya who needs educatin’”: non-Indigenous cultural self-awareness and prisoner education.

Carnes,R 2012, "I tell ya who needs educatin’”: non-Indigenous cultural self-awareness and prisoner education., in Third International Conference on Racisms in the New World Order: Realities of Culture, Colour and Identity Conference Proceedings, The Cairns Institute, James Cook University,.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
carnes-itellyawhoneeds-2012.pdf Published version application/pdf 432.14KB 78

Title "I tell ya who needs educatin’”: non-Indigenous cultural self-awareness and prisoner education.
Author(s) Carnes,RORCID iD for Carnes,R orcid.org/0000-0002-9133-0608
Conference name Third International Conference on Racisms in the New World Order: Realities of colour, culture and identity
Conference location Pacific International Hotel, Cairns, The Cairns Institute, James Cook University.
Conference dates 2012/8/29 - 2012/8/31
Title of proceedings Third International Conference on Racisms in the New World Order: Realities of Culture, Colour and Identity Conference Proceedings
Editor(s) Gopalkrishnan,N
Babacan,H
Publication date 2012
Publisher The Cairns Institute, James Cook University
Keyword(s) adult prisoner education
cultural self awareness
critical ally
Aboriginal sovereignty
white noise
critical whiteness studies
Summary Glen says, “current education is colonial; it ain’t ours. I tell ya who needs educatin’, wadjellas”. Glen is a Noongar man who, along with several other Aboriginal adults living in Western Australia, teaches me in a PhD research project about prisoner education from their perspective. His words pose a question for wadjellas like myself who are raised, taught and work in a white neo-colonial society. We have been raised in, taught in and work in a colonial system. As non-Aboriginal people we have unearned privileges which are often invisible and unacknowledged. How then to address the outcomes of this in a way that might lead to working co-operatively alongside Aboriginal people? What kind of ‘educatin’ could teach us about our own unacknowledged privilege and the disadvantage this can lead to for others? Is the standard cross-cultural awareness training enough?This paper shares some of the teachings of Glen and other participants in this research. It expresses the view that, ultimately, the usually unacknowledged legacy of colonisation and associated issue of denied Aboriginal sovereignty lies at the heart of much of the disadvantage experienced by Aboriginal people today when considering education and the prison system. Addressing gaps in non-Indigenous cultural self-awareness by learning from Aboriginal people is an important factor in improving their experiences of education.
Notes This was completed while affiliated with Murdoch University
Field of Research 160201 Causes and Prevention of Crime
Socio Economic Objective 940403 Criminal Justice
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2012, James Cook University
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073731

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Law
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 83 Abstract Views, 77 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 09 Jun 2015, 11:41:08 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.