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Mental health first aid training for Australian medical and nursing students: an evaluation study

Bond, Kathy S., Jorm, Anthony F., Kitchener, Betty A. and Reavley, Nicola J. 2015, Mental health first aid training for Australian medical and nursing students: an evaluation study, BMC Psychology, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 11, doi: 10.1186/s40359-015-0069-0.

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Title Mental health first aid training for Australian medical and nursing students: an evaluation study
Author(s) Bond, Kathy S.
Jorm, Anthony F.
Kitchener, Betty A.
Reavley, Nicola J.
Journal name BMC Psychology
Volume number 3
Issue number 1
Start page 11
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2015
ISSN 2050-7283
Keyword(s) Evaluation
Medical students
Mental health first aid training
Nursing students
Summary BACKGROUND: The role and demands of studying nursing and medicine involve specific stressors that may contribute to an increased risk for mental health problems. Stigma is a barrier to help-seeking for mental health problems in nursing and medical students, making these students vulnerable to negative outcomes including higher failure rates and discontinuation of study. Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) is a potential intervention to increase the likelihood that medical and nursing students will support their peers to seek help for mental health problems. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a tailored MHFA course for nursing and medical students.

METHODS: Nursing and medical students self-selected into either a face-to-face or online tailored MHFA course. Four hundred and thirty-four nursing and medical students completed pre- and post-course surveys measuring mental health first aid intentions, mental health literacy, confidence in providing help, stigmatising attitudes and satisfaction with the course.

RESULTS: The results of the study showed that both the online and face-to-face courses improved the quality of first aid intentions towards a person experiencing depression, and increased mental health literacy and confidence in providing help. The training also decreased stigmatizing attitudes and desire for social distance from a person with depression.

CONCLUSION: Both online and face-to-face tailored MHFA courses have the potential to improve outcomes for students with mental health problems, and may benefit the students in their future professional careers.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s40359-015-0069-0
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073732

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Created: Tue, 09 Jun 2015, 11:45:50 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.