You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Education for productive futures: a white woman learning from Aboriginal voices

Carnes,R 2013, Education for productive futures: a white woman learning from Aboriginal voices, in VET Research At the Edge – Training for Diversity and Change, Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association,.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
carnes-educationforproductive-2013.pdf Published version application/pdf 725.92KB 29

Title Education for productive futures: a white woman learning from Aboriginal voices
Author(s) Carnes,RORCID iD for Carnes,R orcid.org/0000-0002-9133-0608
Conference name AVETRA 16th Annual Conference: VET Research At the Edge – Training for Diversity and Change
Conference location Fremantle, Western Australia
Conference dates 2013/4/3 - 2013/4/5
Title of proceedings VET Research At the Edge – Training for Diversity and Change
Publication date 2013
Publisher Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association
Keyword(s) prisoner education
productivity
Summary High incarceration rates of Aboriginal Western Australians leads to between 1800 and 2000 Aboriginal prisoners at any one time. Despite this little is written or noted in Australian peer reviewed academic literature about education provision to Aboriginal prisoners. "Closing the Gap: learning from and privileging Aboriginal voices to learn what helps and hinders educationin WA prisons" is a PhD project nearing submission. It has been conducted in partnership with the Deaths in Custody Watch Committee as we ll as with the support of a local community legalservice. The findings are relevant beyond a prison context.This paper specifically focuses on how understandings of the concept of productivity can differ. Itconsiders what might or might not be helpful in achieving productive educational and trainingoutcomes in Western Australian prisons for Indigenous individuals, families and communities. Itrelies heavily on the words of the author's teachers; the Aboriginal participants in the project alongside Indigenous authors and academics. The paper concludes by considering implications for developing and evaluating training programs in more flexible ways that respect diversity.
Notes I was affiliated with Murdoch Uni at this time. My paper is under Abstract 65 http://avetra.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/AVETRA13_0065_Final-Paper.pdf
ISBN 978-0-9805275-3-7
Field of Research 130301 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education
160201 Causes and Prevention of Crime
200211 Postcolonial Studies
Socio Economic Objective 940403 Criminal Justice
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2013, Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073738

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Law
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 57 Abstract Views, 30 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 09 Jun 2015, 16:02:22 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.