Openly accessible

Mental health first aid training for high school teachers: a cluster randomized trial.

Jorm,AF, Kitchener,BA, Sawyer,MG, Scales,H and Cvetkovski,S 2010, Mental health first aid training for high school teachers: a cluster randomized trial., BMC Psychiatry, vol. 10, pp. 51, doi: 10.1186/1471-244X-10-51.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
SYMPLECTIC-LICENCE DRO_Licence_Agreement.txt Click to show the corresponding preview/stream 1.48KB 19
t121646-Mental-health-first-aid-training.pdf Accepted version application/pdf 359.25KB 126

Title Mental health first aid training for high school teachers: a cluster randomized trial.
Author(s) Jorm,AF
Kitchener,BA
Sawyer,MG
Scales,H
Cvetkovski,S
Journal name BMC Psychiatry
Volume number 10
Start page 51
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication England
Publication date 2010
ISSN 1471-244X
Summary BACKGROUND: Mental disorders often have their first onset during adolescence. For this reason, high school teachers are in a good position to provide initial assistance to students who are developing mental health problems. To improve the skills of teachers in this area, a Mental Health First Aid training course was modified to be suitable for high school teachers and evaluated in a cluster randomized trial. METHODS: The trial was carried out with teachers in South Australian high schools. Teachers at 7 schools received training and those at another 7 were wait-listed for future training. The effects of the training on teachers were evaluated using questionnaires pre- and post-training and at 6 months follow-up. The questionnaires assessed mental health knowledge, stigmatizing attitudes, confidence in providing help to others, help actually provided, school policy and procedures, and teacher mental health. The indirect effects on students were evaluated using questionnaires at pre-training and at follow-up which assessed any mental health help and information received from school staff, and also the mental health of the student. RESULTS: The training increased teachers' knowledge, changed beliefs about treatment to be more like those of mental health professionals, reduced some aspects of stigma, and increased confidence in providing help to students and colleagues. There was an indirect effect on students, who reported receiving more mental health information from school staff. Most of the changes found were sustained 6 months after training. However, no effects were found on teachers' individual support towards students with mental health problems or on student mental health. CONCLUSIONS: Mental Health First Aid training has positive effects on teachers' mental health knowledge, attitudes, confidence and some aspects of their behaviour. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ACTRN12608000561381.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1471-244X-10-51
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, BioMed Central
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073741

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 155 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 180 Abstract Views, 145 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 09 Jun 2015, 12:17:06 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.