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A tailored, supportive care intervention using systematic assessment designed for people with inoperable lung cancer: a randomised controlled trial

Schofield, Penelope, Ugalde, Anna, Gough, Karla, Reece, John, Krishnasamy, Meinir, Carey, Mariko, Ball, David and Aranda, Sanchia 2013, A tailored, supportive care intervention using systematic assessment designed for people with inoperable lung cancer: a randomised controlled trial, Psycho-oncology, vol. 22, no. 11, pp. 2445-2453, doi: 10.1002/pon.3306.

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Title A tailored, supportive care intervention using systematic assessment designed for people with inoperable lung cancer: a randomised controlled trial
Author(s) Schofield, Penelope
Ugalde, Anna
Gough, Karla
Reece, John
Krishnasamy, Meinir
Carey, Mariko
Ball, David
Aranda, Sanchia
Journal name Psycho-oncology
Volume number 22
Issue number 11
Start page 2445
End page 2453
Total pages 9
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2013-11
ISSN 1057-9249
Keyword(s) lung cancer
supportive care intervention
Summary Objective : People with inoperable lung cancer experience higher levels of distress, more unmet needs and symptoms than other cancer patients. There is an urgent need to test innovative approaches to improve psychosocial and symptom outcomes in this group. This study tested the hypothesis that a tailored, multidisciplinary supportive care programme based on systematic needs assessment would reduce perceived unmet needs and distress and improve quality of life.

Methods : A randomised controlled trial design was used. The tailored intervention comprised two sessions at treatment commencement and completion. Sessions included a self-completed needs assessment, active listening, self-care education and communication of unmet psychosocial and symptom needs to the multidisciplinary team for management and referral. Outcomes were assessed with the Needs Assessment for Advanced Lung Cancer Patients, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Distress Thermometer and European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Q-C30 V2.0.

Results : One hundred and eight patients with a diagnosis of inoperable lung or pleural cancer (including mesothelioma) were recruited from a specialist facility before the trial closed prematurely (original target 200). None of the primary contrasts of interest were significant (all p > 0.10), although change score analysis indicated a relative benefit from the intervention for unmet symptom needs at 8 and 12 weeks post-assessment (effect size = 0.55 and 0.40, respectively).

Conclusion : Although a novel approach, the hypothesis that the intervention would benefit perceived unmet needs, psychological morbidity, distress and health-related quality of life was not supported overall.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/pon.3306
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920209 Mental Health Services
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073805

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Nursing and Midwifery
Centre for Quality and Patient Safety
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