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The association between major depressive disorder, use of antidepressants and bone mineral density (BMD) in men.

Rauma,PH, Pasco,JA, Berk,M, Stuart,AL, Koivumaa-Honkanen,H, Honkanen,RJ, Hodge,JM and Williams,LJ 2015, The association between major depressive disorder, use of antidepressants and bone mineral density (BMD) in men., Journal of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 177-185.

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Title The association between major depressive disorder, use of antidepressants and bone mineral density (BMD) in men.
Author(s) Rauma,PH
Pasco,JAORCID iD for Pasco,JA orcid.org/0000-0002-8968-4714
Berk,MORCID iD for Berk,M orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Stuart,ALORCID iD for Stuart,AL orcid.org/0000-0001-8770-9511
Koivumaa-Honkanen,H
Honkanen,RJ
Hodge,JM
Williams,LJORCID iD for Williams,LJ orcid.org/0000-0002-1377-1272
Journal name Journal of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions
Volume number 15
Issue number 2
Start page 177
End page 185
Publisher International Society of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions
Place of publication Greece
Publication date 2015-06
ISSN 1108-7161
Keyword(s) Antidepressants
Bone mineral density
Depression
Osteoporosis
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor
Summary OBJECTIVE: Both depression and use of antidepressants have been negatively associated with bone mineral density (BMD) but mainly in studies among postmenopausal women. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate these relationships in men. METHODS: Between 2006 and 2011, 928 men (aged 24-98 years) from the Geelong Osteoporosis Study completed a comprehensive questionnaire, clinical measurements and had BMD assessments at the forearm, spine, total hip and total body. Major depressive disorder (MDD) was identified using a structured clinical interview (SCID-I/NP). The cross-sectional associations between BMD and both MDD and antidepressant use were analyzed using multivariable linear regression. RESULTS: Of the study population, 84 (9.1%) men had a single MDD episode, 50 (5.4%) had recurrent episodes and 65 (7.0%) were using antidepressants at the time of assessment. Following adjustments, recurrent MDD was associated with lower BMD at the forearm and total body (-6.5%, P=0.033 and -2.5%, P=0.033, respectively compared to men with no history of MDD), while single MDD episodes were associated with higher BMD at the total hip (+3.4%, P=0.030). Antidepressant use was associated with lower BMD only in lower-weight men (<75-110 kg depending on bone site). CONCLUSIONS: Both depression and use of antidepressants should be taken into account as possible risk factors for osteoporosis in men.
Language eng
Field of Research 110319 Psychiatry (incl Psychotherapy)
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, International Society of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073821

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Created: Mon, 15 Jun 2015, 12:56:44 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.