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Psychiatric disorders, psychotropic medication use and falls among women: an observational study

Williams, Lana J., Pasco, Julie A., Stuart, Amanda L., Jacka, Felice N., Brennan, Sharon L., Dobbins, Amelia G., Honkanen, Risto, Koivumaa-Honkanen, Heli, Rauma, Päivi H. and Berk, Michael 2015, Psychiatric disorders, psychotropic medication use and falls among women: an observational study, BMC psychiatry, vol. 15, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.1186/s12888-015-0439-4.

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Title Psychiatric disorders, psychotropic medication use and falls among women: an observational study
Author(s) Williams, Lana J.
Pasco, Julie A.ORCID iD for Pasco, Julie A. orcid.org/0000-0002-8968-4714
Stuart, Amanda L.
Jacka, Felice N.ORCID iD for Jacka, Felice N. orcid.org/0000-0002-9825-0328
Brennan, Sharon L.
Dobbins, Amelia G.
Honkanen, Risto
Koivumaa-Honkanen, Heli
Rauma, Päivi H.
Berk, MichaelORCID iD for Berk, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Journal name BMC psychiatry
Volume number 15
Article ID 75
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1471-244X
Keyword(s) Antidepressants
Anxiety
Benzodiazepine
Depression
Falls
Psychotropic medication
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychiatry
NURSING-HOME RESIDENTS
OLDER-PEOPLE
RISK-FACTORS
DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS
RECURRENT FALLS
MENTAL-HEALTH
GAIT PATTERNS
METAANALYSIS
PREVALENCE
COMMUNITY
Summary BACKGROUND: Psychotropic agents known to cause sedation are associated with an increased risk of falls, but the role of psychiatric illness as an independent risk factor for falls is not clear. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the association between psychiatric disorders, psychotropic medication use and falls risk.

METHODS: This study examined data collected from 1062 women aged 20-93 yr (median 50 yr) participating in the Geelong Osteoporosis Study, a large, ongoing, population-based study. Depressive and anxiety disorders for the preceding 12-month period were ascertained by clinical interview. Current medication use and falls history were self-reported. Participants were classified as fallers if they had fallen to the ground at least twice during the same 12-month period. Anthropometry, demographic, medical and lifestyle factors were determined. Logistic regression was used to test the associations, after adjusting for potential confounders.

RESULTS: Fifty-six women (5.3%) were classified as fallers. Those meeting criteria for depression within the past 12 months had a 2.4-fold increased odds of falling (unadjusted OR = 2.4, 95% CI 1.2-4.5). Adjustment for age and mobility strengthened the relationship (adjusted OR = 2.7, 95% CI 1.4-5.2) between depression and falling, with results remaining unchanged following further adjustment for psychotropic medication use (adjusted OR = 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-5.6). In contrast, past (prior to 12-month) depression were not associated with falls. No association was observed between anxiety and falls risk. Falling was associated with psychotropic medication use (unadjusted OR = 2.8, 95% CI 1.5-5.2), as well as antidepressant (unadjusted OR = 2.4, 95% CI 1.2-4.8) and benzodiazepine use (unadjusted OR = 3.4, 95% CI 1.6-7.3); associations remained unchanged following adjustment for potential confounders.

CONCLUSION: The likelihood of falls was increased among those with depression within the past 12 months, independent of psychotropic medication use and other recognised confounders, suggesting an independent effect of depression on falls risk. Psychotropic drug use was also confirmed as an independent risk factor for falls, but anxiety disorders were not. Further research into the underlying mechanisms is warranted.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12888-015-0439-4
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073840

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.