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Mechanisms underlying neurocognitive dysfunctions in recurrent major depression

Gałecki, Piotr, Talarowska, Monika, Anderson, George, Berk, Michael and Maes, Michael 2015, Mechanisms underlying neurocognitive dysfunctions in recurrent major depression, Medical Science Monitor, vol. 21, pp. 1535-1547, doi: 10.12659/MSM.893176.

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Title Mechanisms underlying neurocognitive dysfunctions in recurrent major depression
Author(s) Gałecki, Piotr
Talarowska, Monika
Anderson, George
Berk, MichaelORCID iD for Berk, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Maes, Michael
Journal name Medical Science Monitor
Volume number 21
Start page 1535
End page 1547
Total pages 13
Publisher Medical Science International Publishing
Place of publication Warsaw, Poland
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1643-3750
Summary Recent work shows that depression is intimately associated with changes in cognitive functioning, including memory, attention, verbal fluency, and other aspects of higher-order cognitive processing. Changes in cognitive functioning are more likely to occur when depressive episodes are recurrent and to abate to some degree during periods of remission. However, with accumulating frequency and duration of depressive episodes, cognitive deficits can become enduring, being evident even when mood improves. Such changes in cognitive functioning give depression links to mild cognitive impairment and thereby with neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and multiple sclerosis. Depression may then be conceptualized on a dimension of depression - mild cognitive impairment - dementia. The biological underpinnings of depression have substantial overlaps with those of neurodegenerative conditions, including reduced neurogenesis, increased apoptosis, reactive oxygen species, tryptophan catabolites, autoimmunity, and immune-inflammatory processes, as well as decreased antioxidant defenses. These evolving changes over the course of depressive episodes drive the association of depression with neurodegenerative conditions. As such, the changes in cognitive functioning in depression have important consequences for the treatment of depression and in reconceptualizing the role of depression in wider neuroprogressive conditions. Here we review the data on changes in cognitive functioning in recurrent major depression and their association with other central conditions.
Language eng
DOI 10.12659/MSM.893176
Field of Research 111714 Mental Health
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Medical Science Monitor
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution noncommercial no derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073852

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.