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Improved blood biomarkers but no cognitive effects from 16 weeks of multivitamin supplementation in healthy older adults

Harris, Elizabeth, Macpherson, Helen and Pipingas, Andrew 2015, Improved blood biomarkers but no cognitive effects from 16 weeks of multivitamin supplementation in healthy older adults, Nutrients, vol. 7, no. 5, pp. 3796-3812, doi: 10.3390/nu7053796.

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Title Improved blood biomarkers but no cognitive effects from 16 weeks of multivitamin supplementation in healthy older adults
Author(s) Harris, Elizabeth
Macpherson, HelenORCID iD for Macpherson, Helen orcid.org/0000-0002-3603-9359
Pipingas, Andrew
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 7
Issue number 5
Start page 3796
End page 3812
Total pages 17
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2015-05-19
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) biomarkers
cognition
multivitamins
vitamins
Aged
Aging
C-Reactive Protein
Cognition Disorders
Dietary Supplements
Double-Blind Method
Female
Homocysteine
Humans
Lipids
Male
Middle Aged
Oxidative Stress
Reference Values
Sex Factors
Vitamin B 12
Vitamin B 6
Summary Supplementation with vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients may be beneficial for cognition, especially in older adults. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of multivitamin supplementation in older adults on cognitive function and associated blood biomarkers. In a randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trial, healthy women (n = 68) and men (n = 48) aged 55-65 years were supplemented daily for 16 weeks with women's and men's formula multivitamin supplements. Assessments at baseline and post-supplementation included computerised cognitive tasks and blood biomarkers relevant to cognitive aging. No cognitive improvements were observed after supplementation with either formula; however, several significant improvements were observed in blood biomarkers including increased levels of vitamins B6 and B12 in women and men; reduced C-reactive protein in women; reduced homocysteine and marginally reduced oxidative stress in men; as well as improvements to the lipid profile in men. In healthy older people, multivitamin supplementation improved a number of blood biomarkers that are relevant to cognition, but these biomarker changes were not accompanied by improved cognitive function.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu7053796
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
Socio Economic Objective 0 Not Applicable
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073898

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.