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Problematic eating and food-related behaviours and excessive weight gain : why children in out-of-home care are at risk

Cox, Rachael, Skouteris, Helen, Hemmingsson, Erk, Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew and Hardy, Louise L. 2016, Problematic eating and food-related behaviours and excessive weight gain : why children in out-of-home care are at risk, Australian social work, vol. 69, no. 3, 10, pp. 338-347, doi: 10.1080/0312407X.2015.1024267.

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Title Problematic eating and food-related behaviours and excessive weight gain : why children in out-of-home care are at risk
Author(s) Cox, Rachael
Skouteris, Helen
Hemmingsson, Erk
Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, MatthewORCID iD for Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew orcid.org/0000-0003-1145-6057
Hardy, Louise L.
Journal name Australian social work
Volume number 69
Issue number 3
Season 10
Start page 338
End page 347
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 0312-407X
1447-0748
Keyword(s) adolescents
health social work
out-of-home care
Summary Emerging evidence suggests that abuse and neglect in childhood may play a role in subsequent development of obesity. One population group particularly at risk is children and young people living in out-of-home care (OOHC). Given this population is already a vulnerable group, identifying potential mechanisms by which childhood abuse and neglect increases risk for obesity is essential. A possible explanation is that problematic eating and food-related behaviours (i.e., emotional eating, compulsive eating, overeating, binge eating, stealing or hoarding food) might mediate the association between adverse childhood experiences and obesity. Hence, the overall goal of this paper was to provide a narrative review of eating and food-related difficulties for children in care and their possible association with unhealthy and excessive weight gain. This review revealed a shortage of existing empirical papers and signalled particular need for further examination of the mediating effects of problematic eating.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/0312407X.2015.1024267
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Australian Association of Social Workers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073908

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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