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Reducing children's classroom sitting time using sit-to-stand desks: findings from pilot studies in UK and Australian primary schools.

Clemes, Stacy A., Barber, Sally E., Bingham, Daniel D., Ridgers, Nicola D., Fletcher, Elly, Pearson, Natalie, Salmon, Jo and Dunstan, David W. 2016, Reducing children's classroom sitting time using sit-to-stand desks: findings from pilot studies in UK and Australian primary schools., Journal of public health, vol. 38, no. 3, pp. 526-533, doi: 10.1093/pubmed/fdv084.

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Title Reducing children's classroom sitting time using sit-to-stand desks: findings from pilot studies in UK and Australian primary schools.
Author(s) Clemes, Stacy A.
Barber, Sally E.
Bingham, Daniel D.
Ridgers, Nicola D.ORCID iD for Ridgers, Nicola D. orcid.org/0000-0001-5713-3515
Fletcher, Elly
Pearson, Natalie
Salmon, JoORCID iD for Salmon, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Dunstan, David W.
Journal name Journal of public health
Volume number 38
Issue number 3
Start page 526
End page 533
Total pages 8
Publisher Oxford University Press (OUP)
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1741-3850
Keyword(s) activPAL
ethnic diversity
health
pilot controlled trial
sedentary behaviour
socioeconomic status
Summary BACKGROUND: This research examined the influence of sit-to-stand desks on classroom sitting time in primary school children. METHODS: Pilot controlled trials with similar intervention strategies were conducted in primary schools in Melbourne, Australia, and Bradford, UK. Sit-to-stand desks replaced all standard desks in the Australian intervention classroom. Six sit-to-stand desks replaced a bank of standard desks in the UK intervention classroom. Children were exposed to the sit-to-stand desks for 9-10 weeks. Control classrooms retained their normal seated desks. Classroom sitting time was measured at baseline and follow-up using the activPAL3 inclinometer. RESULTS: Thirty UK and 44 Australian children provided valid activPAL data at baseline and follow-up. The proportion of time spent sitting in class decreased significantly at follow-up in both intervention groups (UK: -9.8 ± 16.5% [-52.4 ± 66.6 min/day]; Australian: -9.4 ± 10% [-43.7 ± 29.9 min/day]). No significant changes in classroom sitting time were observed in the UK control group, while a significant reduction was observed in the Australian control group (-5.9 ± 11.7% [-28.2 ± 28.3 min/day]). CONCLUSIONS: Irrespective of implementation, incorporating sit-to-stand desks into classrooms appears to be an effective way of reducing classroom sitting in this diverse sample of children. Longer term efficacy trials are needed to determine effects on children's health and learning.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/pubmed/fdv084
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Oxford University Press (OUP)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073913

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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