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Ultrafine wools: comfort and handle properties for next-to-skin knitwear and manufacturing performance

Tester, David, McGregor, Bruce A. and Staynes, Laurie 2015, Ultrafine wools: comfort and handle properties for next-to-skin knitwear and manufacturing performance, Textile research journal, vol. 85, no. 11, pp. 1181-1189, doi: 10.1177/0040517514547209.

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Title Ultrafine wools: comfort and handle properties for next-to-skin knitwear and manufacturing performance
Author(s) Tester, David
McGregor, Bruce A.ORCID iD for McGregor, Bruce A. orcid.org/0000-0002-4574-4236
Staynes, Laurie
Journal name Textile research journal
Volume number 85
Issue number 11
Start page 1181
End page 1189
Total pages 9
Publisher Sage Publications
Place of publication Princeton, N.J.
Publication date 2015-07
ISSN 0040-5175
Keyword(s) fabric mass per unit area
fiber properties
sensory evaluations
wearer trial
Wool ComfortMeter
Wool HandleMeter
Science & Technology
Technology
Materials Science, Textiles
Materials Science
SUPERFINE MERINO WOOL
FABRIC-EVOKED PRICKLE
KNITTED FABRICS
CASHMERE
FIBER
YARNS
ATTRIBUTES
CURVATURE
LUXURY
Summary This study aimed to quantify the skin comfort and handle properties of a range of wool fabrics produced from ultrafine wool (13.7–15.1 µm) and in doing so determine if differences in fiber diameter and staple crimp frequency (5.3–7.1 crimps/cm) were important in these properties. The fabrics were evaluated using a range of subjective and objective measurement techniques, including the Wool ComfortMeter, the Wool HandleMeter and in wearer trials. This work indicated that single jersey fabrics made from ultrafine wool are approaching the limit of objective and subjective evaluation of next-to-skin comfort. The results from the Wool ComfortMeter, Wool HandleMeter and the wearer trial show that there were no significant effects that can be attributed to wool staple crimp (fiber curvature) in these ultrafine wool fabrics. The work also demonstrated a difference in the manufacturing response when knitted fabric made from wools of different fiber diameter (13.7–23.7 µm), and using yarns of the same count, resulted in a progressively higher fabric mass per unit area as mean fiber diameter was progressively reduced.
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/0040517514547209
Field of Research 091012 Textile Technology
Socio Economic Objective 860401 Clothing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Sage Publications
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073934

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.