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Intradialytic Laughter Yoga therapy for haemodialysis patients: a pre-post intervention feasibility study.

Bennett,PN, Parsons,T, Ben-Moshe,R, Neal,M, Weinberg,MK, Gilbert,K, Ockerby,C, Rawson,H, Herbu,C and Hutchinson,AM 2015, Intradialytic Laughter Yoga therapy for haemodialysis patients: a pre-post intervention feasibility study., BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 15, pp. 176, doi: 10.1186/s12906-015-0705-5.

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Title Intradialytic Laughter Yoga therapy for haemodialysis patients: a pre-post intervention feasibility study.
Author(s) Bennett,PN
Parsons,T
Ben-Moshe,R
Neal,M
Weinberg,MK
Gilbert,K
Ockerby,C
Rawson,H
Herbu,C
Hutchinson,AMORCID iD for Hutchinson,AM orcid.org/0000-0001-5065-2726
Journal name BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume number 15
Start page 176
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication England
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1472-6882
Summary BACKGROUND: Laughter Yoga consists of physical exercise, relaxation techniques and simulated vigorous laughter. It has been associated with physical and psychological benefits for people in diverse clinical and non-clinical settings, but has not yet been tested in a haemodialysis setting. The study had three aims: 1) to examine the feasibility of conducting Laughter Yoga for patients with end stage kidney disease in a dialysis setting; 2) to explore the psychological and physiological impact of Laughter Yoga for these patients; and 3) to estimate the sample size required for future research. METHODS: Pre/post intervention feasibility study. Eighteen participants were recruited into the study and Laughter Yoga therapists provided a four week intradialytic program (30-min intervention three times per week). Primary outcomes were psychological items measured at the first and last Laughter Yoga session, including: quality of life; subjective wellbeing; mood; optimism; control; self-esteem; depression, anxiety and stress. Secondary outcomes were: blood pressure, intradialytic hypotensive episodes and lung function (forced expiratory volume). Dialysis nurses exposed to the intervention completed a Laughter Yoga attitudes and perceptions survey (n = 11). Data were analysed using IBM SPSS Statistics v22, including descriptive and inferential statistics, and sample size estimates were calculated using G*Power. RESULTS: One participant withdrew from the study for medical reasons that were unrelated to the study during the first week (94 % retention rate). There were non-significant increases in happiness, mood, and optimism and a decrease in stress. Episodes of intradialytic hypotension decreased from 19 pre and 19 during Laughter Yoga to 4 post Laughter Yoga. There was no change in lung function or blood pressure. All nurses agreed or strongly agreed that Laughter Yoga had a positive impact on patients' mood, it was a feasible intervention and they would recommend Laughter Yoga to their patients. Sample size calculations for future research indicated that a minimum of 207 participants would be required to provide sufficient power to detect change in key psychological variables. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence that Laughter Yoga is a safe, low-intensity form of intradialytic physical activity that can be successfully implemented for patients in dialysis settings. Larger studies are required, however, to determine the effect of Laughter Yoga on key psychological variables. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry - ACTRN12614001130651 . Registered 23 October 2014.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12906-015-0705-5
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, BioMed Central
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074061

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.