You are not logged in.

Role recognition and changes to self-identity in family caregivers of people with advanced cancer: a qualitative study

Ugalde, Anna, Krishnasamy, Meinir and Schofield, Penelope 2012, Role recognition and changes to self-identity in family caregivers of people with advanced cancer: a qualitative study, Supportive care in cancer, vol. 20, no. 6, pp. 1175-1181, doi: 10.1007/s00520-011-1194-9.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Role recognition and changes to self-identity in family caregivers of people with advanced cancer: a qualitative study
Author(s) Ugalde, AnnaORCID iD for Ugalde, Anna orcid.org/0000-0002-2473-8435
Krishnasamy, Meinir
Schofield, Penelope
Journal name Supportive care in cancer
Volume number 20
Issue number 6
Start page 1175
End page 1181
Total pages 7
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2012-06
ISSN 0941-4355
1433-7339
Summary Purpose : Family caregivers of people with advanced cancer can provide extensive support to the patient. However, the role is not well defined and their experiences are poorly understood. This study aimed to explore how caregivers view their role and the impact of their caregiving.

Methods : A symbolic interactionist framework guided the in-depth individual interviews and grounded theory methodology was used to analyse the data. A total of 17 interviews were conducted: 13 with active caregivers and 4 with bereaved caregivers.

Results : Three dominant codes are presented. Caregivers lacked role recognition, as they struggled to recognise their role existed, even though they took on extensive and challenging tasks. Caregivers reported substantial loss or changes to their self-identity: with some caregivers reporting not being able to stop thinking about caregiving and others having difficulty answering questions about themselves. Caregivers also demonstrated difficulty in taking a break: active caregivers did not consider taking a break, whereas bereaved caregivers retrospectively admitted needing a break but reported an inability to take one.

Conclusions : Caregiving is complex and extensive. People who care for those with advanced cancer are in need of intervention to provide support and assistance to them in their role. However, this needs to be structured with consideration for how caregivers view their role.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s00520-011-1194-9
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074095

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 10 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 13 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 72 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 01 Jul 2015, 09:23:05 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.