Small area-level socioeconomic status and all-cause mortality within 10 years in a population-based cohort of women: Data from the Geelong Osteoporosis Study

Brennan-Olsen, Sharon L., Williams, Lana J., Holloway, Kara L., Hosking, Sarah M., Stuart, Amanda L., Dobbins, Amelia G. and Pasco, Julie A. 2015, Small area-level socioeconomic status and all-cause mortality within 10 years in a population-based cohort of women: Data from the Geelong Osteoporosis Study, Preventive medicine reports, vol. 2, pp. 505-511.

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Title Small area-level socioeconomic status and all-cause mortality within 10 years in a population-based cohort of women: Data from the Geelong Osteoporosis Study
Author(s) Brennan-Olsen, Sharon L.
Williams, Lana J.ORCID iD for Williams, Lana J. orcid.org/0000-0002-1377-1272
Holloway, Kara L.ORCID iD for Holloway, Kara L. orcid.org/0000-0001-5064-2990
Hosking, Sarah M.
Stuart, Amanda L.ORCID iD for Stuart, Amanda L. orcid.org/0000-0001-8770-9511
Dobbins, Amelia G.
Pasco, Julie A.ORCID iD for Pasco, Julie A. orcid.org/0000-0002-8968-4714
Journal name Preventive medicine reports
Volume number 2
Start page 505
End page 511
Total pages 7
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-01-01
ISSN 2211-3355
Keyword(s) Health inequalities
Lifestyle behaviors
Mortality
Social disadvantage
Weight status
Summary Background: The social gradient of health and mortality is well-documented. However, data are scarce regarding whether differences in mortality are observed across socio-economic status (SES) measured at the small area-level. We investigated associations between area-level SES and all-cause mortality in Australian women aged ≥. 20. years. Methods: We examined SES, obesity, hypertension, lifestyle behaviors and all-cause mortality within 10. years post-baseline (1994), for 1494 randomly-selected women. Participants' residential addresses were matched to Australian Bureau of Statistics Census data to identify area-level SES, and deaths were ascertained from the Australian National Deaths Index. Logistic regression models were adjusted for age, and subsequent adjustments made for measures of weight status and lifestyle behaviors. Results: We observed 243 (16.3%) deaths within 10. years post-baseline. Females in SES quintiles 2-4 (less disadvantaged) had lower odds of mortality (0.49-0.59) compared to SES quintile 1 (most disadvantaged) under the best model, after adjusting for age, smoking status and low mobility. Conclusions: Compared to the lowest SES quintile (most disadvantaged), females in quintiles 2 to 5 (less disadvantaged) had significantly lower odds ratio of all-cause mortality within 10. years. Associations between extreme social disadvantage and mortality warrant further attention from research, public health and policy arenas.
Language eng
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920507 Women's Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074111

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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