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How active are people in metropolitan parks? An observational study of park visitation in Australia

Veitch, Jenny, Carver, Alison, Abbott, Gavin, Giles-Corti, Billie, Timperio, Anna and Salmon, Jo 2015, How active are people in metropolitan parks? An observational study of park visitation in Australia, BMC public health, vol. 15, Article Number : 610, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1186/s12889-015-1960-6.

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Title How active are people in metropolitan parks? An observational study of park visitation in Australia
Author(s) Veitch, JennyORCID iD for Veitch, Jenny orcid.org/0000-0001-8962-0887
Carver, AlisonORCID iD for Carver, Alison orcid.org/0000-0001-5166-3574
Abbott, Gavin
Giles-Corti, Billie
Timperio, Anna
Salmon, JoORCID iD for Salmon, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 15
Season Article Number : 610
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication Bingley, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) Observation
Park
Physical activity
Public open space
Park visitor
Summary BACKGROUND: Parks are generally an under-utilized resource in the community with great potential to enhance levels of physical activity. If parks are to attract more visitors across a broad cross-section of the population and facilitate increased physical activity, research is needed to better understand park visitor characteristics and how visitors spend their time in parks. The Recording and EValuating Activity in a Modified Park (REVAMP) study is a natural experiment monitoring a park upgrade in a low socioeconomic status (SES) neighborhood. This study described the observed baseline characteristics of park visitors (age, sex) and characteristics of visitation (weekday or weekend day, period of the day) and explored how these characteristics were associated with observed park-based physical activity in two metropolitan parks located Melbourne, Australia. METHODS: Direct observations of park visitors were conducted using a modified version of SOPARC (the System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities) on four weekdays and four weekend days. During weekdays, observations were conducted every hour from 7:30 am-4:30 pm and on weekend days from 8:30 am-4:30 pm. This equated to a total of 1460 scans across the two parks. Chi-square tests examined bivariate associations between park-based physical activity, and socio-demographic and park visitation characteristics. Logistic regression models examined the odds of being observed engaging in moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity relative to lying/sitting/standing according to socio-demographic and park visitation characteristics. RESULTS: In total, 4756 park visitors were observed with the majority visiting on weekend days (87 %) and in the afternoon (41 %). Most visitors (62 %) were lying, sitting or standing, with only 29 % observed engaging in moderate-intensity and 9 % in vigorous-intensity physical activity. Park use differed by time of day, sex, age group, and neighborhood SES. Physical activity was lower for women than men (OR 0.76) and higher among visitors in the high SES area (OR 1.52). CONCLUSIONS: Parks offer substantial opportunities for people of all ages to engage in physical activity; however, this study showed that a large proportion of the park visitors observed were engaged in sedentary pursuits. Further research on how park design, amenities and programming can optimize park visitation and park-based physical activity is needed. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Current controlled trial ISRCTN50745547 , registration date 11.1.2014.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1960-6
Field of Research 1117 Public Health and Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID LP1202003396
Copyright notice ©2015, BioMed Central
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074171

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.