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Hygienic practices among food vendors in educational institutions in Ghana: the case of Konongo

Monney, Isaac, Agyei, Dominic and Owusu, Wellington 2013, Hygienic practices among food vendors in educational institutions in Ghana: the case of Konongo, Foods, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 282-294, doi: 10.3390/foods2030282.

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Title Hygienic practices among food vendors in educational institutions in Ghana: the case of Konongo
Author(s) Monney, Isaac
Agyei, DominicORCID iD for Agyei, Dominic orcid.org/0000-0003-2280-4096
Owusu, Wellington
Journal name Foods
Volume number 2
Issue number 3
Start page 282
End page 294
Total pages 13
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2013-07-09
ISSN 2304-8158
Keyword(s) food hygiene
food safety
vendors
sanitary conditions
Konongo
Ghana
Summary With the booming street food industry in the developing world there is an urgent need to ensure food vendors adhere to hygienic practices to protect public health. This study assessed the adherence to food hygiene practices by food vendors in educational institutions in Konongo, Ghana. Structured questionnaires, extensive observation and interviews were used for the study involving 60 food vendors from 20 basic schools. Attributable to the influence of school authorities and the level of in-training of food vendors, the study points out that food vendors in educational institutions generally adhered to good food hygiene practices, namely, regular medical examination (93%), protection of food from flies and dust (55%); proper serving of food (100%); good hand hygiene (63%); and the use of personal protective clothing (52%). The training of food vendors on food hygiene, instead of the level of education had a significant association (p < 0.05) with crucial food hygiene practices such as medical examination, hand hygiene and protection of food from flies and dust. Further, regulatory bodies legally mandated to efficiently monitor the activities of food vendors lacked the adequate capacity to do so. The study proposes that efforts should be geared towards developing training programmes for food vendors as well as capacity building of the stakeholders.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/foods2030282
Field of Research 100302 Bioprocessing, Bioproduction and Bioproducts
090899 Food Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 860899 Human Pharmaceutical Products not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074188

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.