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Cardiovascular prevention model from Kenyan slums to migrants in the Netherlands

van de Vijver, Steven, Oti, Samuel, Moll van Charante, Eric, Allender, Steven, Foster, Charlie, Lange, Joep, Oldenburg, Brian, Kyobutungi, Catherine and Agyemang, Charles 2015, Cardiovascular prevention model from Kenyan slums to migrants in the Netherlands, Globalization and health, vol. 11, no. 11, pp. 1-6, doi: 10.1186/s12992-015-0095-y.

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Title Cardiovascular prevention model from Kenyan slums to migrants in the Netherlands
Author(s) van de Vijver, Steven
Oti, Samuel
Moll van Charante, Eric
Allender, Steven
Foster, Charlie
Lange, Joep
Oldenburg, Brian
Kyobutungi, Catherine
Agyemang, Charles
Journal name Globalization and health
Volume number 11
Issue number 11
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1744-8603
Keyword(s) African migrants
Hypertension
Kenya
Prevention
Reverse innovation
Slums
Treatment
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
SYSTEMATIC ANALYSIS
GLOBAL BURDEN
DISEASE
NAIROBI
AFRICA
PREVALENCE
COUNTRIES
AWARENESS
GHANAIAN
Summary Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the main cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. As prevention and treatment of CVD often requires active screening and lifelong follow up it is a challenge for health systems both in high-income and low and middle-income countries to deliver adequate care to those in need, with efficient use of resources.We developed a health service model for primary prevention of CVD suitable for implementation in the Nairobi slums, based on best practices from public health and the private sectors. The model consists of four key intervention elements focusing on increasing awareness, incentives for promoting access to screening and treatment, and improvement of long-term adherence to prescribed medications. More than 5,000 slum dwellers aged ≥35 years and above have been screened in the study resulting in more than 1000 diagnosed with hypertension and referred to the clinic.Some marginalized groups in high-income countries like African migrants in the Netherlands also have low rates of awareness, treatment and control of hypertension as the slum population in Nairobi. The parallel between both groups is that they have a combination of risky lifestyle, are prone to chronic diseases such as hypertension, have limited knowledge about hypertension and its complications, and a tendency to stay away from clinics partly due to cultural beliefs in alternative forms of treatment, and lack of trust in health providers. Based on these similarities it was suggested by several policymakers that the model from Nairobi can be applied to other vulnerable populations such as African migrants in high-income countries. The model can be contextualized to the local situation by adapting the key steps of the model to the local settings.The involvement and support of African communities' infrastructures and health care staff is crucial, and the most important enabler for successful implementation of the model in migrant communities in high-income countries. Once these stakeholders have expressed their interest, the impact of the adapted intervention can be measured through an implementation research approach including collection of costs from health care providers' perspective and health effects in the target population, similar to the study design for Nairobi.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12992-015-0095-y
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920103 Cardiovascular System and Diseases
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, BioMed Central
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074197

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Population Health
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.