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Identification of prey captures in Australian Fur Seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus) using head-mounted accelerometers: field validation with animal-borne video cameras

Volpov, Beth L., Hoskins, Andrew J., Battaile, Brian C., Viviant, Morgane, Wheatley, Kathryn E., Marshall, Greg, Abernathy, Kyler and Arnould, John P. Y. 2015, Identification of prey captures in Australian Fur Seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus) using head-mounted accelerometers: field validation with animal-borne video cameras, PLoS One, vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 1-19, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0128789.

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Title Identification of prey captures in Australian Fur Seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus) using head-mounted accelerometers: field validation with animal-borne video cameras
Author(s) Volpov, Beth L.
Hoskins, Andrew J.
Battaile, Brian C.
Viviant, Morgane
Wheatley, Kathryn E.
Marshall, Greg
Abernathy, Kyler
Arnould, John P. Y.ORCID iD for Arnould, John P. Y. orcid.org/0000-0003-1124-9330
Journal name PLoS One
Volume number 10
Issue number 6
Start page 1
End page 19
Total pages 19
Publisher Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1932-6203
Summary This study investigated prey captures in free-ranging adult female Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus) using head-mounted 3-axis accelerometers and animal-borne video cameras. Acceleration data was used to identify individual attempted prey captures (APC), and video data were used to independently verify APC and prey types. Results demonstrated that head-mounted accelerometers could detect individual APC but were unable to distinguish among prey types (fish, cephalopod, stingray) or between successful captures and unsuccessful capture attempts. Mean detection rate (true positive rate) on individual animals in the testing subset ranged from 67-100%, and mean detection on the testing subset averaged across 4 animals ranged from 82-97%. Mean False positive (FP) rate ranged from 15-67% individually in the testing subset, and 26-59% averaged across 4 animals. Surge and sway had significantly greater detection rates, but also conversely greater FP rates compared to heave. Video data also indicated that some head movements recorded by the accelerometers were unrelated to APC and that a peak in acceleration variance did not always equate to an individual prey item. The results of the present study indicate that head-mounted accelerometers provide a complementary tool for investigating foraging behaviour in pinnipeds, but that detection and FP correction factors need to be applied for reliable field application.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0128789
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology)
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074214

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.