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Time-in-area represents foraging activity in a wide-ranging pelagic forager

Warwick-Evans, V., Atkinson, P.W., Gauvain, R.D., Robinson, L.A., Arnould, J.P.Y. and Green, J.A. 2015, Time-in-area represents foraging activity in a wide-ranging pelagic forager, Marine ecology progress series, vol. 527, pp. 233-246, doi: 10.3354/meps11262.

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Title Time-in-area represents foraging activity in a wide-ranging pelagic forager
Author(s) Warwick-Evans, V.
Atkinson, P.W.
Gauvain, R.D.
Robinson, L.A.
Arnould, J.P.Y.ORCID iD for Arnould, J.P.Y. orcid.org/0000-0003-1124-9330
Green, J.A.
Journal name Marine ecology progress series
Volume number 527
Start page 233
End page 246
Total pages 14
Publisher Inter-Research
Place of publication Amelinghausen, Germany
Publication date 2015-01-01
ISSN 0171-8630
Keyword(s) Accelerometer
Biologging
GPS tracking
Marine spatial planning
Morus bassanus
Northern gannet
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Physical Sciences
Ecology
Marine & Freshwater Biology
Oceanography
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
GANNETS MORUS-BASSANUS
NORTHERN GANNETS
1ST-PASSAGE TIME
MARINE PREDATOR
CAPE GANNETS
HABITAT USE
SEABIRDS
BEHAVIOR
ECOSYSTEM
Summary Successful Marine Spatial Planning depends upon the identification of areas with high importance for particular species, ecosystems or processes. For seabirds, advancements in biologging devices have enabled us to identify these areas through the detailed study of at-sea behaviour. However, in many cases, only positional data are available and the presence of local biological productivity and hence seabird foraging behaviour is inferred from these data alone, under the untested assumption that foraging activity is more likely to occur in areas where seabirds spend more time. We fitted GPS devices and accelerometers to northern gannets Morus bassanus and categorised the behaviour of individuals outside the breeding colony as plunge diving, surface foraging, floating and flying. We then used the locations of foraging events to test the efficiency of 2 approaches: time-in-area and kernel density (KD) analyses, which are widely employed to detect highly-used areas and interpret foraging behaviour from positional data. For KD analyses, the smoothing parameter (h) was calculated using the ad hoc method (KDad hoc), and KDh=9.1, where h = 9.1 km, to designate core foraging areas from location data. A high proportion of foraging events occurred in core foraging areas designated using KDad hoc, KDh=9.1, and time-in-area. Our findings demonstrate that foraging activity occurs in areas where seabirds spend more time, and that both KD analysis and the time-in-area approach are equally efficient methods for this type of analysis. However, the time-in-area approach is advantageous in its simplicity, and in its ability to provide the shapes commonly used in planning. Therefore, the time-in-area approach can be used as a simple way of using seabirds to identify ecologically important locations from both tracking and survey data.
Language eng
DOI 10.3354/meps11262
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology)
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074216

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.