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The danger within: the role of genetic, behavioural and ecological factors in population persistence of colour polymorphic species

Bolton, Peri E, Rollins, Lee A and Griffith, Simon C 2015, The danger within: the role of genetic, behavioural and ecological factors in population persistence of colour polymorphic species, Molecular ecology, vol. 24, no. 12, pp. 2907-2915, doi: 10.1111/mec.13201.

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Title The danger within: the role of genetic, behavioural and ecological factors in population persistence of colour polymorphic species
Author(s) Bolton, Peri E
Rollins, Lee AORCID iD for Rollins, Lee A orcid.org/0000-0002-3279-7005
Griffith, Simon C
Journal name Molecular ecology
Volume number 24
Issue number 12
Start page 2907
End page 2915
Total pages 9
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng
Publication date 2015-06
ISSN 0962-1083
1365-294X
Keyword(s) behavioural strategies
conflict
geographic variation
incompatibility
population ecology
sympatry
Summary Polymorphic species have been the focus of important work in evolutionary biology. It has been suggested that colour polymorphic species have specific evolutionary and population dynamics that enable them to persist through environmental changes better than less variable species. We suggest that recent empirical and theoretical work indicates that polymorphic species may be more vulnerable to extinction than previously thought. This vulnerability arises because these species often have a number of correlated sexual, behavioural, life history and ecological traits, which can have a simple genetic underpinning. When exacerbated by environmental change, these alternate strategies can lead to conflict between morphs at the genomic and population levels, which can directly or indirectly affect population and evolutionary dynamics. In this perspective, we identify a number of ways in which the nature of the correlated traits, their underpinning genetic architecture, and the inevitable interactions between colour morphs can result in a reduction in population fitness. The principles illustrated here apply to all kinds of discrete polymorphism (e.g. behavioural syndromes), but we focus primarily on colour polymorphism because they are well studied. We urge further empirical investigation of the genetic architecture and interactions in polymorphic species to elucidate the impact on population fitness.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/mec.13201
Field of Research 060311 Speciation and Extinction
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Wiley
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074373

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.