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Fishing directly selects on growth rate via behaviour: implications of growth-selection that is independent of size

Biro, Peter A and Sampson, Portia 2015, Fishing directly selects on growth rate via behaviour: implications of growth-selection that is independent of size, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological sciences, vol. 282, no. 1802, pp. 1-6, doi: 10.1098/rspb.2014.2283.

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Title Fishing directly selects on growth rate via behaviour: implications of growth-selection that is independent of size
Author(s) Biro, Peter AORCID iD for Biro, Peter A orcid.org/0000-0002-3565-240X
Sampson, Portia
Journal name Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological sciences
Volume number 282
Issue number 1802
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Publisher Royal Society Publishing
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-03-07
ISSN 1471-2954
Keyword(s) personality
catchability
bias
behavioural syndromes
life history
boldness
Summary Size-selective harvest of fish and crustacean populations has reduced stock numbers, and led to reduced growth rates and earlier maturation. In contrast to the focus on size-selective effects of harvest, here, we test the hypothesis that fishing may select on life-history traits (here, growth rate) via behaviour, even in the absence of size selection. If true, then traditional size-limits used to protect segments of a population cannot fully protect fast growers, because at any given size, fast-growers will be more vulnerable owing to bolder behaviour. We repeatedly measured individual behaviour and growth of 86 crayfish and found that fast-growing individuals were consistently bold and voracious over time, and were subsequently more likely to be harvested in single- and group-trapping trials. In addition, there was some indication that sex had independent effects on behaviour and trappability, whereby females tended to be less active, shyer, slower-growing and less likely to be harvested, but not all these effects were significant. This study represents, to our knowledge, the first across-individual support for this hypothesis, and suggests that behaviour is an important mechanism for fishing selectivity that could potentially lead to evolution of reduced intrinsic growth rates.
Language eng
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2014.2283
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES
Socio Economic Objective 969999 Environment not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Royal Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074545

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Created: Thu, 12 Nov 2015, 14:27:58 EST

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