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Executive power and scaled-up gender subtexts in Australian entrepreneurial universities

Blackmore, Jill and Sawers, Naarah 2015, Executive power and scaled-up gender subtexts in Australian entrepreneurial universities, Gender and education, vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 320-337, doi: 10.1080/09540253.2015.1027670.

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Title Executive power and scaled-up gender subtexts in Australian entrepreneurial universities
Author(s) Blackmore, JillORCID iD for Blackmore, Jill orcid.org/0000-0002-1049-2788
Sawers, Naarah
Journal name Gender and education
Volume number 27
Issue number 3
Start page 320
End page 337
Total pages 18
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2015-04-16
ISSN 0954-0253
1360-0516
Keyword(s) gender
higher education
leadership
Social Sciences
Education & Educational Research
HIGHER-EDUCATION
IVORY TOWERS
POLITICS
MANAGERIALISM
Summary Deputy Vice Chancellor and Pro Vice Chancellor positions have proliferated in response to the global, corporatised university landscape [Scott, G., S. Bell, H. Coates, and L. Grebennikov. 2010. “Australian Higher Education Leaders in Times of Change: The Role of Pro Vice Chancellor and Deputy Vice Chancellor.” Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management 32 (4): 401–418]. Senior leadership is the sphere where academic and management identities are negotiated and values around the role of the university are decided. This paper examines the changing and gendered nature of the senior leadership setting and its implications for diversity in and of university leadership. The analysis draws from a three-year empirical study funded by the Australian Research Council on leadership in Australian universities. It focuses on executive leaders in three universities – one which is research-intensive, the second, in a regional site, and the third, university of technology. The article argues that the university landscape and its management systems are being restructured in gendered ways. It utilises the notion of organisational gender subtexts to make explicit how gender works through structural and cultural reform.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/09540253.2015.1027670
Field of Research 130103 Higher Education
Socio Economic Objective 930401 Management and Leadership of Schools/Institutions
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074548

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Created: Thu, 13 Aug 2015, 14:58:54 EST

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