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Self-regulated learning strategies & academic achievement in online higher education learning environments: a systematic review

Broadbent, J. and Poon, W.L. 2015, Self-regulated learning strategies & academic achievement in online higher education learning environments: a systematic review, Internet and higher education, vol. 27, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1016/j.iheduc.2015.04.007.

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Title Self-regulated learning strategies & academic achievement in online higher education learning environments: a systematic review
Author(s) Broadbent, J.ORCID iD for Broadbent, J. orcid.org/0000-0003-4045-2039
Poon, W.L.
Journal name Internet and higher education
Volume number 27
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-07-01
ISSN 1096-7516
1873-5525
Keyword(s) Social Sciences
Education & Educational Research
Online
Distance education
Higher education
University
Self-regulated learning strategies
Academic achievement
COLLEGE-STUDENTS
METAANALYSIS
PERFORMANCE
EFFICACY
PROCRASTINATION
TECHNOLOGY
MOTIVATION
FEEDBACK
OUTCOMES
SUCCESS
Summary © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. As enrolments in online courses continue to increase, there is a need to understand how students can best apply self-regulated learning strategies to achieve academic success within the online environment. A search of relevant databases was conducted in December 2014 for studies published from 2004 to Dec 2014 examining SRL strategies as correlates of academic achievement in online higher education settings. From 12 studies, the strategies of time management, metacognition, effort regulation, and critical thinking were positively correlated with academic outcomes, whereas rehearsal, elaboration, and organisation had the least empirical support. Peer learning had a moderate positive effect, however its confidence intervals crossed zero. Although the contributors to achievement in traditional face-to-face settings appear to generalise to on-line context, these effects appear weaker and suggest that (1) they may be less effective, and (2) that other, currently unexplored factors may be more important in on-line contexts.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.iheduc.2015.04.007
Field of Research 130202 Curriculum and Pedagogy Theory and Development
1303 Specialist Studies In Education
Socio Economic Objective 930101 Learner and Learning Achievement
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074576

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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