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Maternal obesity in females born small: pregnancy complications and offspring disease risk

Mahizir, Dayana, Briffa, Jessica F., Hryciw, Deanne H., Wadley, Glenn D., Moritz, Karen M. and Wlodek, Mary E. 2016, Maternal obesity in females born small: pregnancy complications and offspring disease risk, Molecular nutrition & food research, vol. 60, no. 1, pp. 8-17, doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201500289.

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Title Maternal obesity in females born small: pregnancy complications and offspring disease risk
Author(s) Mahizir, Dayana
Briffa, Jessica F.
Hryciw, Deanne H.
Wadley, Glenn D.ORCID iD for Wadley, Glenn D. orcid.org/0000-0002-6617-4359
Moritz, Karen M.
Wlodek, Mary E.
Journal name Molecular nutrition & food research
Volume number 60
Issue number 1
Start page 8
End page 17
Total pages 10
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-01
ISSN 1613-4133
Keyword(s) Developmental programming
Maternal pregnancy
Fetal growth restriction
Insulin resistance
Obesity
Summary Obesity is a major public health crisis, with 1.6 billion adults worldwide being classified as overweight or obese in 2014. Therefore, it is not surprising that the number of women who are overweight or obese at the time of conception is increasing. Obesity during pregnancy is associated with the development of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. The developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis proposes that perturbations during critical stages of development can result in adverse fetal changes, which leads to an increased risk of developing diseases in adulthood. Of particular concern, children born to obese mothers are at a greater risk of developing cardiometabolic disease. One subset of the population who are predisposed to developing obesity are children born small for gestational age, which occurs in 10% of pregnancies worldwide. Epidemiological studies report that these growth restricted children have an increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes, obesity and hypertension. Importantly during pregnancy, growth restricted females have a higher risk of developing cardiometabolic disease, indicating that they may have an exacerbated phenotype if they are also overweight or obese. Thus the development of early pregnancy interventions targeted to obese mothers may prevent their children from developing cardiometabolic disease in adulthood. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/mnfr.201500289
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920507 Women's Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2016, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074678

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.