You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Exporting social policy from Latin America to the Philippines: Securitisation, neoliberalism and multilateral mediation of poverty policies

Reid, Benjamin 2013, Exporting social policy from Latin America to the Philippines: Securitisation, neoliberalism and multilateral mediation of poverty policies, in IIPPE 2013: Political Economy, Activism and Alternative Economic Strategies: Proceedings of the International Initiative for Promoting Political Economy: Fourth Annual Conference in Political Economy: Proceedings of the Political Economy, Activism and Alternative Economic Strategies 2013 Conference, International Initiative for the Promotion of Political Economy, London, United Kingdom, pp. 1-34.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
SYMPLECTIC-LICENCE DRO_Licence_Agreement.txt Click to show the corresponding preview/stream 1.48KB 15
reid-exportsocialpolicyfromlatin-2013.pdf Accepted version application/pdf 263.17KB 27

Title Exporting social policy from Latin America to the Philippines: Securitisation, neoliberalism and multilateral mediation of poverty policies
Author(s) Reid, Benjamin
Conference name International Initiative for Promoting Political Economy Fourth Annual Conference in Political Economy “Political Economy, Activism and Alternative Economic Strategies”
Conference location The Hague, The Netherlands
Conference dates 2013/07/09 - 2013/07/11
Title of proceedings IIPPE 2013: Political Economy, Activism and Alternative Economic Strategies: Proceedings of the International Initiative for Promoting Political Economy: Fourth Annual Conference in Political Economy: Proceedings of the Political Economy, Activism and Alternative Economic Strategies 2013 Conference
Publication date 2013
Start page 1
End page 34
Total pages 34
Publisher International Initiative for the Promotion of Political Economy
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Summary Recent years have seen an increased acceptance of social transfers as part of renewed efforts at poverty alleviation policies based on social risk management. There has been an instance in the use and promotion of conditional cash transfer (CCT) policies by multilateral development agencies (MDAs). One case is the Philippines. The ideational basis of CCTs can be traced to the influence of neostructuralism in Latin America. One facet of this was an attempt to reconcile neoliberal strategies of development with aspirations for guaranteed minimum incomes. The adoption of CCTs was mediated by MDA s that further reduced the modest concessions to poor people's rights implicit in Latin American programs. The Philippines demonstrates that MDAs have promoted a more heavily securitised and compliance-focused versions of CCTs that was derived the Colombian security state. Although small grants are welcomed by poor households, they have acted to further enforce state control while maintaining a neoliberal policy focus.
Language eng
Field of Research 160603 Comparative Government and Politics
140202 Economic Development and Growth
Socio Economic Objective 940302 International Aid and Development
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©[2013 IIPPE]
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074777

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Humanities and Social Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 109 Abstract Views, 44 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Sep 2015, 14:15:55 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.