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Religiosity, citizenship and belonging: the everyday experiences of young Australian Muslims

Johns, Amelia, Mansouri, Fethi and Lobo, Michele 2015, Religiosity, citizenship and belonging: the everyday experiences of young Australian Muslims, Journal of muslim minority affairs, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 171-190, doi: 10.1080/13602004.2015.1046262.

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Title Religiosity, citizenship and belonging: the everyday experiences of young Australian Muslims
Author(s) Johns, Amelia
Mansouri, FethiORCID iD for Mansouri, Fethi orcid.org/0000-0002-8914-0485
Lobo, MicheleORCID iD for Lobo, Michele orcid.org/0000-0001-7733-666X
Journal name Journal of muslim minority affairs
Volume number 35
Issue number 2
Start page 171
End page 190
Total pages 20
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1360-2004
1469-9591
Summary  Since 11 September 2001 Muslim Diasporas have emerged as objects of anxiety in Western societies. Underlying this (in)security-driven problematisation is the question of whether Muslims living in the West have the capacity to become fully active citizens while maintaining their religious beliefs, rituals and practices. This apprehension has prompted reactionary government programmes, particularly targeting young Muslims. Such responses fail to recognise the societal capacities that practising Muslims possess, including those informed by the ethical precepts of Islamic faith. This paper argues that it is timely to explore expressions of Islamic religiosity as they are grounded in everyday multicultural environments. The paper draws on survey data and interviews conducted with Muslims living in Melbourne, Australia. We take into consideration key variables of age and generation to highlight how young, practising Muslims enact citizenship through Islamic rituals and faith-based practices and traditions. The paper will draw from key findings to argue that these performances provide a foundation for exploring ways of ‘living’ together in a manner that privileges ethics central to Islamic faith traditions.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/13602004.2015.1046262
Field of Research 160803 Race and Ethnic Relations
1699 Other Studies In Human Society
2204 Religion And Religious Studies
Socio Economic Objective 940111 Ethnicity
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Taylor and Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074796

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