Night-time continence care in Australian residential aged care facilities: findings from a grounded theory study

Ostaszkiewicz, Joan, O'Connell, Beverley and Dunning, Trisha 2016, Night-time continence care in Australian residential aged care facilities: findings from a grounded theory study, Contemporary nurse, vol. 52, no. 2-3, pp. 152-162, doi: 10.1080/10376178.2015.1011047.

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Title Night-time continence care in Australian residential aged care facilities: findings from a grounded theory study
Author(s) Ostaszkiewicz, JoanORCID iD for Ostaszkiewicz, Joan orcid.org/0000-0003-4159-4493
O'Connell, Beverley
Dunning, TrishaORCID iD for Dunning, Trisha orcid.org/0000-0002-0284-1706
Journal name Contemporary nurse
Volume number 52
Issue number 2-3
Start page 152
End page 162
Total pages 11
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1037-6178
Keyword(s) continence care
grounded theory
incontinence
night-time
residential aged care
ritual
Summary BACKGROUND: Continence care commonly disrupts sleep in residential aged care facilities, however, little is known about what staff do when providing continence care, and the factors that inform their practice. AIMS: To describe nurses' and personal careworkers' beliefs and experiences of providing continence care at night in residential aged care facilities. METHODS/DESIGN: Eighteen nurses and personal careworkers were interviewed about continence care, and 24 hours of observations were conducted at night in two facilities. RESULTS/FINDINGS: Most residents were checked overnight. This practice was underpinned by staffs' concern that residents were intractably incontinent and at risk of pressure injuries. Staff believed pads protected and dignified residents. Decisions were also influenced by beliefs about limited staff-to-resident ratios. CONCLUSION: Night-time continence care should be audited to ensure decisions are based on residents' preferences, skin health, sleep/wake status, ability to move in bed, and the frequency, severity and type of residents' actual incontinence.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/10376178.2015.1011047
Field of Research 111001 Aged Care Nursing
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074841

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