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Peeling the onion: understanding others' lived experience

Miles, Maureen, Chapman, Ysanne and Francis, Karen 2015, Peeling the onion: understanding others' lived experience, Contemporary nurse, vol. 50, no. 2-3, pp. 286-295, doi: 10.1080/10376178.2015.1067571.

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Title Peeling the onion: understanding others' lived experience
Author(s) Miles, Maureen
Chapman, Ysanne
Francis, Karen
Journal name Contemporary nurse
Volume number 50
Issue number 2-3
Start page 286
End page 295
Total pages 17
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1037-6178
Keyword(s) Lived experience
hermeneutic phenomenology
midwifery
nursing
qualitative research
Summary BACKGROUND: Society and some healthcare professionals often marginalise pregnant women who take illicit substances. Likewise the midwives who care for these women are often viewed as working on the edge of society. The aim of this research was to examine the lived world of these midwives to gain insight into the world of their work.

DESIGN: A phenomenological study informed by Heidegger, Gadamer and Merleau-Ponty was chosen to frame these lived experiences of the midwives. Using face-to-face phenomenological interviews data were collected from 12 midwives whose work is only caring for women who take illicit drugs.

RESULTS: The 3 fundamental themes that emerged from the study were: making a difference, establishing partnerships: and letting go and refining practice. Conclusions and impetus for this paper: Lived experiences are unique and can be difficult for researchers to grasp. The stories told by participants are sometimes intangible and often couched in metaphor. This paper aims to discuss lived experience and suggests that like an onion, several layers have to be peeled away before meaning can be exposed; and like peeling onions, each cover reveals another layer beneath that is different from before and different from the next. Exemplars from this midwifery study are used to explain lived experiences.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/10376178.2015.1067571
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Taylor & Francis
Free to Read? Yes
Free to Read Start Date 2017-01-01
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074844

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.