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Excessive daytime sleepiness and falls among older men and women: cross-sectional examination of a population-based sample

Hayley, Amie C., Williams, Lana J., Kennedy, Gerard A., Holloway, Kara L., Berk, Michael, Brennan-Olsen, Sharon L. and Pasco, Julie A. 2015, Excessive daytime sleepiness and falls among older men and women: cross-sectional examination of a population-based sample, BMC geriatrics, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 74-74, doi: 10.1186/s12877-015-0068-2.

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Title Excessive daytime sleepiness and falls among older men and women: cross-sectional examination of a population-based sample
Author(s) Hayley, Amie C.
Williams, Lana J.ORCID iD for Williams, Lana J. orcid.org/0000-0002-1377-1272
Kennedy, Gerard A.
Holloway, Kara L.ORCID iD for Holloway, Kara L. orcid.org/0000-0001-5064-2990
Berk, MichaelORCID iD for Berk, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Brennan-Olsen, Sharon L.
Pasco, Julie A.ORCID iD for Pasco, Julie A. orcid.org/0000-0002-8968-4714
Journal name BMC geriatrics
Volume number 15
Issue number 1
Start page 74
End page 74
Total pages 1
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-07-05
ISSN 1471-2318
Keyword(s) Elderly
Epidemiology
Excessive daytime sleepiness
Falls
Older adults
Population
Summary Background: Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) has been associated with an increased risk for falls among clinical samples of older adults. However, there is little detailed information among population-representative samples. The current study aimed to assess the relationship between EDS and falls among a cohort of population-based older adults. Methods: This study assessed 367 women aged 60-93years (median 72, interquartile range 65-79) and 451 men aged 60-92years (median 73, interquartile range 66-80) who participated in the Geelong Osteoporosis Study between the years 2001 and 2008. Falls during the prior year were documented via self-report, and for men, falls risk score was obtained using an Elderly Fall Screening Test (EFST). Sleepiness was assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and scores of≥10 indicated EDS. Differences among those with and without EDS in regard to falls were tested using logistic regression models. Results: Among women, 50 (13.6 %) individuals reported EDS. Women with EDS were more likely to report a fall, and were more likely to report the fall occurring outside. EDS was similarly associated with an increased risk of a fall following adjustment for use of a walking aid, cases of nocturia and antidepressant medication use (adjusted OR∈=∈2.54, 95 % CI 1.24-5.21). Multivariate modelling revealed antidepressant use (current) as an effect modifier (p∈<∈.001 for the interaction term). After stratifying the data by antidepressant medication use, the association between EDS and falls was sustained following adjustment for nocturia among antidepressant non-users (adjusted OR∈=∈2.63, 95 % CI 1.31-5.30). Among men, 72 (16.0 %) individuals reported EDS. No differences were detected for men with and without EDS in regard to reported falls, and a trend towards significance was noted between EDS and a high falls risk as assessed by the EFST (p∈=∈0.06), however, age explained this relationship (age adjusted OR∈=∈2.20, 95 % CI 1.03-1.10). Conclusions: For women, EDS is independently associated with at least one fall during the previous year, and this is more likely to occur whilst located outside. Amelioration of EDS may assist in improving functional outcomes among these individuals by reducing the risk for falls.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12877-015-0068-2
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, BioMed Central
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074871

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.