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Reducing the risk of heart disease among Indian Australians: knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding food practices - a focus group study

Fernandez, Ritin, Rolley, John X., Rajaratnam, Rohan, Everett, Bronwyn and Davidson, Patricia M. 2015, Reducing the risk of heart disease among Indian Australians: knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding food practices - a focus group study, Food and Nutrition Research, vol. 59, Article no. 25770, pp. 1-7.

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Title Reducing the risk of heart disease among Indian Australians: knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding food practices - a focus group study
Author(s) Fernandez, Ritin
Rolley, John X.
Rajaratnam, Rohan
Everett, Bronwyn
Davidson, Patricia M.
Journal name Food and Nutrition Research
Volume number 59
Season Article no. 25770
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher Co-Action Publishing
Place of publication Bålsta, Sweden
Publication date 2015-06-05
ISSN 1654-661X
Keyword(s) Asian Indians
South Asian
attitudes
diet
food practices
heart disease
knowledge
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Food Science & Technology
Nutrition & Dietetics
METABOLIC SYNDROME
UNITED-STATES
ASSOCIATION
OBESITY
SLEEP
Summary BACKGROUND: Australia has a growing number of Asian Indian immigrants. Unfortunately, this population has an increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). Dietary adherence is an important strategy in reducing risk for CHD. This study aimed to gain greater understanding of the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs relating to food practices in Asian Indian Australians. METHODS: Two focus groups with six participants in each were recruited using a convenience sampling technique. Verbatim transcriptions were made and thematic content analysis undertaken. RESULTS: Four main themes that emerged from the data included: migration as a pervasive factor for diet and health; importance of food in maintaining the social fabric; knowledge and understanding of health and diet; and elements of effective interventions. DISCUSSION: Diet is a complex constructed factor in how people express themselves individually, in families and communities. There are many interconnected factors influencing diet choice that goes beyond culture and religion to include migration and acculturation. CONCLUSIONS: Food and associated behaviors are an important aspect of the social fabric. Entrenched and inherent knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and traditions frame individuals' point of reference around food and recommendations for an optimal diet.
Language eng
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920103 Cardiovascular System and Diseases
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Co-Action Publishing
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074896

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.