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Use of indicators to assess the sustainability of housing developments in Australia

Fuller, Robert 2015, Use of indicators to assess the sustainability of housing developments in Australia, in ISDRS 2015 : Vulnerability and Adaptive Capacity. Proceedings of 21st International Sustainable Development Research Society Conference, International Sustainable Development Research Society, [Geelong, Vic.], pp. 1-10.

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Title Use of indicators to assess the sustainability of housing developments in Australia
Author(s) Fuller, Robert
Conference name International Sustainable Development Research Society Conference Tipping Point (21st : 2015 : Geelong, Vic.)
Conference location Geelong, Vic.
Conference dates 10-12 Jul. 2015
Title of proceedings ISDRS 2015 : Vulnerability and Adaptive Capacity. Proceedings of 21st International Sustainable Development Research Society Conference
Publication date 2015
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher International Sustainable Development Research Society
Place of publication [Geelong, Vic.]
Summary Most new housing in Australia is occurring on greenfield sites on the edges of the capital cities. These housing developments are often criticised for their social and environmental unsustainability. These unsustainable suburbs are a legacy for future generations. They will create dire social and environmental problems if a serious economic downturn was to occur or a resource shortage e.g. oil was to make accessibility impossible. Coupled to these threats is that of the social ‘undesirability’ of isolated suburbs where only those on low incomes made their home. Most of those on higher incomes seek established suburbs which have ‘character’, social amenities and ease of access. Typically, these are in older suburbs close to city centres. This paper describes a methodology that has been developed to analyse past and future housing developments. The results of the analysis can provide a guide to improving the sustainability of these suburbs. The methodology uses several criteria to reflect the fact that no single criterion is adequate to describe or analyse the sustainability of a housing development. Sustainability should embrace social and environmental perspectives, so a multi-criteria analysis is appropriate. The theoretical framework for this methodology has been described elsewhere. However, in this previous work only five criteria were considered: energy use, resource use, neighbourhood character, neighbourhood connectedness and social diversity. In each case, high and low sustainability practice has been identified so that ranking is possible. This paper initially summarizes the way in which these previous five criteria are assessed but then adds a sixth criterion (social connectedness) because of a perceived gap in the previous assessment. The results of an analysis of three suburbs reported in the previous work are updated. They score poorly in terms of social connectedness underlining the need to ‘repair’ these suburbs in order to improve their overall sustainability.
ISBN 9780730000211
Language eng
Field of Research 120507 Urban Analysis and Development
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2015, ISDRS
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074929

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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