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Noncontact detection and analysis of respiratory function using microwave Doppler Radar

Lee, Yee Siong, Pathirana, Pubudu N., Evans, Robin J. and Steinfort, Christopher L. 2015, Noncontact detection and analysis of respiratory function using microwave Doppler Radar, Journal of sensors, vol. 2015, Article ID : 548136, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1155/2015/548136.

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Title Noncontact detection and analysis of respiratory function using microwave Doppler Radar
Author(s) Lee, Yee Siong
Pathirana, Pubudu N.ORCID iD for Pathirana, Pubudu N. orcid.org/0000-0001-8014-7798
Evans, Robin J.
Steinfort, Christopher L.
Journal name Journal of sensors
Volume number 2015
Season Article ID : 548136
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1687-725X
1687-7268
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Technology
Engineering, Electrical & Electronic
Instruments & Instrumentation
Engineering
HEART-RATE-VARIABILITY
EXHALATION
STRESS
Summary Real-time respiratory measurement with Doppler Radar has an important advantage in the monitoring of certain conditions such as sleep apnoea, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and many other general clinical uses requiring fast nonwearable and non-contact measurement of the respiratory function. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of using Doppler Radar in measuring the basic respiratory frequencies (via fast Fourier transform) for four different types of breathing scenarios: normal breathing, rapid breathing, slow inhalation-fast exhalation, and fast inhalation-slow exhalation conducted in a laboratory environment. A high correlation factor was achieved between the Doppler Radar-based measurements and the conventional measurement device, a respiration strap. We also extended this work from basic signal acquisition to extracting detailed features of breathing function (I: E ratio). This facilitated additional insights into breathing activity and is likely to trigger a number of new applications in respiratory medicine.
Language eng
DOI 10.1155/2015/548136
Field of Research 090609 Signal Processing
090303 Biomedical Instrumentation
090399 Biomedical Engineering not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920115 Respiratory System and Diseases (incl. Asthma)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074949

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Engineering
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Created: Wed, 12 Aug 2015, 16:35:51 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.